10 poems that make grown men cry


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(Photo: Jeremy Pullen, Creative Commons)

poems-cry-bookscover.jpgHave you heard the phrase "it's enough to make a grown man cry?" Grown men crying -- and whatever caused it -- has always been a point of fascination for journalist Anthony Holden, especially when it came to poetry. So when his son, Ben Holden, approached him and suggested they turn this idea into a book, Anthony was keen. They approached 100 prominent men -- writers, film makers, academics and more -- and asked them to share a poem that has moved them to the point of tears and to write a short introduction for it. It could be any poem at all, from Keats to a favourite nursery rhyme. Then the Holdens compiled the responses into a book titled Poems That Make Grown Men Cry: 100 Men on the Words that Move Them.

The contributors didn't hold back. "The great surprise to us has been how candid some of these intros are," Anthony said. Anthony and Ben talked about the collection on CBC's Tapestry. You can listen to that conversation in the audio player below.




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There are 100 poems in the book overall. Below are 10 highlights!


"Dulce et Decorum Est" by Wilfred Owen, chosen by Christopher Hitchens




"God's World" by Edna St. Vincent Millay, chosen by Patrick Stewart




"The Lanyard" by Billy Collins, chosen by J.J. Abrams




"The Voice" by Thomas Hardy, chosen by Seamus Heaney



"Orpheus, Eurydice, Hermes" by Ranier Maria Rilke, chosen by Colm Tóibín




"During Wind and Rain" by Thomas Hardy, chosen by Ken Follett




"The Broken Tower" by Hart Crane, chosen by Harold Bloom




"In Memory of W.B. Yeats" by W.H. Auden, chosen by Salman Rushdie




"My Papa's Waltz" by Theodore Roethke, chosen by Stanley Tucci




"Long Distance I and II" by Tony Harrison, chosen by Daniel Radcliffe






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