George R. R. Martin shares image of the 'real Iron Throne'

joffrey-throne.jpg

A certain amount of creative license and interpretation is involved when any novel is adapted into a TV or film production. But how do the authors feel when seeing the characters and creations they dreamed up translated onto the screen? George R.R. Martin, whose A Song of Ice and Fire books inspired the phenomenally popular HBO series Game of Thrones, recently provided some insight into this on his blog by revealing what he really imagined the famous Iron Throne to look like.

"When I write about the Iron Throne, I SEE it in my head...and I try to describe it as best I can," he wrote. "Not being a blacksmith or an ironmonger, however, I hammer it together with words, striving to make all of you, my readers, see what I see ...

Game-of-Thrones-300.jpgA dozen different artists have done versions of the Iron Throne over the years. Some have been very striking, some less so, but none of them have ever been quite RIGHT. Their versions never quite matched what I saw in my mind's eye."

Martin also comments that the HBO version, while "iconic" for millions of viewers, isn't quite what he had imagined. He then shares an image of the Iron Throne painted by artist Marc Simonetti. The author describes this interpretation as the closest to his own vision.

"This Iron Throne is massive. Ugly. Assymetric. It's a throne made by blacksmiths hammering together half-melted, broken, twisted swords, wrenched from the hands of dead men or yielded up by defeated foes...a symbol of conquest...it has the steps I describe, and the height. From on top, the king dominates the throne room. And there are thousands of swords in it, not just a few ... This Iron Throne is scary. And not at all a comfortable seat, just as Aegon intended."

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