Poop, placenta and boogers: Blog takes on parents' social media


First aired on Q (02/05/13) 

Blair Koenig has seen too much crap on social media: literally. First poops, explosive diarrhea, placenta smoothies, 100-ultrasound-photo albums and other parental overshares started taking over the writer's Facebook newsfeed about four years.

"I have seen so many placentas, you have no idea," Koenig told Q's Jian Ghomeshi in a recent interview. "Some people take pictures just to say, 'Look at my tree of life.' Other people say, 'Yum, yum, yum.'"

Naturally, the child-free Koenig started a blog, with the tongue-in-cheek title STFU Parents, to chronicle some of the most cringe-worthy examples of parents' (mis)use of social media.

"And they've just gotten crazier and crazier," she says of the submissions she receives from her loyal readers.

Recent blog posts include a mother sharing a photo of her son's heart-shaped poop on Valentine's Day, a parent discussing how delicious breast-milk icing is on birthday cake and someone providing advice to an expecting mother on how to break her water.

Now, Koenig has written a book, STFU Parents, based on her popular blog.

The book splits parenting overshares into several categories:


  • The gross-out factor.
Koenig says this one is pretty self explanatory and covers the standard bodily fluids, like boogers and snot. "You don't need to see [a] strand of snot in your newsfeed."


  • The Sanctimommy.
Koenig says we've all met one of these parents, who is "a sanctimonious mother who basically thinks that her parenting is a little better -- or a lot better -- than everybody else's."

She gives an example of a mother complaining on Facebook that some people in a public bathroom flushed the toilet after she had asked them not too because her baby was sleeping.


  • MommyJacking.
MommyJacking happens when a parent comments on a thread and changes the topic to be about their child. Koenig says this happens frequently when there is a major catastrophic event or crime, like a mass shooting.

"When someone posts a picture of their child's diaper blow-out and says something about the Boston bombings relating it to their child's diaper explosion it's like, 'Oh god, please, just stop. Stop the madness,'" she said.


  • Woe is mom.
This category highlights women who complain about the little things about motherhood, like having their driveway redone while the baby is trying to sleep.

Koenig says the blog and the book are just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the evolution of oversharing, and she hopes to start more projects about these trends. She says a blog about pet owner overshares may be near. 




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