Recently posted by Christina Harnett

Changing Trains - one mother's journey with Down Syndrome

Posted by Christina Harnett

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On the day her son was born, Catherine MacInnis had to face her worst fears.
All her life she'd worried - and believed - she would have a child with special needs.
Then it happened.
On April 18, 2015 Sarah Keaveny-Vos's documentary about Catherine and her son Cameron won an award from the Radio Television Digital News Directors Association.
Since then Catherine says Cameron's life has "blossomed." A month after our doc aired -Cameron was asked by then Premier Robert Ghiz to be part of the welcoming committee for Prince Charles and Duchess Camilla. He stood next to Premier Ghiz and welcomed the royal couple, and gave the Duchess flowers!
Cam and his basketball team were recognized for being a shining example of what acceptance and kindness is all about at the Annual Pink Shirt day for Anti-Bullying.
Cameron is part of of team PEI at the Special Olympics
And he took part in the "Freezin for a Reason" fundraising event - to raise money for Special Olympics.
You can see him below jumping into a giant pool of freezing cold water!
We're pleased to present "Changing Trains" again.

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"They can hear you...and they're hurt."

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Multiple studies have completely de-bunked any link between autism and childhood vaccines.
The scientist whose work first posed it has been discredited and stripped of his license.
And yet, for some people, the myth lives on, and the debate continues over whether or not kids should be vaccinated.
It's a conversation some autistic people and their families find very hard to hear.
The CBC's Melissa Mancini introduces us to two of them.

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Send Me Books, Mom

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This week family and friends in New Brunswick are saying good-bye to Marianna Stack.
Stack was the co-founder and former president of the Elizabeth Fry Society in Saint John, a group devoted to helping criminalized and marginalized women, especially those in prison.
That was Marianna Stack's passion, and each week for many years she visited female prisoners at the provincial facility in Saint John, and at the Nova Institution in Truro, Nova Scotia.
She also started the Mother/Child Read Aloud program - a way for women to read and record stories for the children they'd left at home.
It began in 2000, and became a model for similar initiatives across the country.
In 2011, the CBC's Karen Wells produced a documentary about Stack and her program. We re-play that story and hear from Kim Pate, the national director of the Elizabeth Fry Society.


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Making It Work in Atlantic Canada

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Too few young people, too many seniors.
Too few immigrants and too much dependency on natural resources - and the government - to solve our problems.
For years, the issues facing this region's economy have been well known.
But now, according many sources, we are reaching a point of no return.
This week we hear from three younger people who ARE making a go if it in the region.
Natalie Chavarie, Bojan Furst and Amanda McDougall tell us why they decided to stay and what they think the future holds.

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Coming out in Cape Breton

Posted by Christina Harnett

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What's the most commonly asked question after a baby is born?
"Is it a boy or a girl?"
But sometimes the answer's not that cut and dried.
Reporter Joan Weeks brings us a story about shifting genders - young people who feel they were born in the wrong body.

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Faith, Culture and whether to cover your head...

Posted by Christina Harnett

There's been a lot of debate lately concerning Muslim women...what they wear on their heads, when they wear it and why. And where and how they worship, and what that means.
Arabic is the second most commonly spoken language in some parts of the the region, yet the Muslim world, and especially the place women occupy in it, remains a mystery to many Atlantic Canadians.
That's why the CBC's Margot Brunelle brought together three women from Halifax to talk about some of the debate swirling around their faith and culture.

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The Ordination of Helen

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Helen McFadyen always felt a pull to religious life...a calling.
So it makes sense that she was recently ordained as a minister.
But, as you'll hear on this week's Atlantic Voice, her journey to the pulpit has been extraordinary.
From seven year old heretic, to ex-Catholic - to perhaps the only ministry student in her class who was also a committed atheist.
And not all of Helen's challenges's have been spiritual.

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Six Months in the Life of a Military Family

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Last July, HMCS Toronto pulled away from a Halifax jetty, headed for the Black Sea on a six month deployment.
Martin Caya was one of the people on board...his wife Tammy and their girls Gaby and Jillian, left behind to deal with his absence.
Even though Canada is no longer at war, military people are still being sent out on missions, often to dangeous places.
Reporter Stephen Puddicombe was curious about how families handle those periodic separations...and how they handle going from a two parent household to one.
He spent six months visiting with Tammy and her daughters.

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On the Move - How and Why We Travel for Work

Posted by Christina Harnett

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We know that people in this region often work in one place but live in another.
People on the Alberta "turn-around," flying in and out every few weeks is the obvious example.
There are also truckers, construction workers, military personnel, fishermen, nurses...the list goes on and on.
But even though more Canadians than ever seem to be on the move for their jobs, there's almost no information about who they are, or what effect this mobility is having on our communities and our economy.
The On the Move Partnerhip is a seven year, multi-million dollar, multi-province research project that's trying to answer some of those questions.
Pauline spoke with project director Dr Barbara Neis from Memorial University of Newfoundland.

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"Answer back, brother."

Posted by Christina Harnett

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It's been more than two years since Chris Metallic disappeared.
He was a student at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick, four hours south of his home on the Listuguj First Nation in Quebec.
Chris left a party one night in November 2012 - and vanished. He was 20 years old.
Since then his family has tried to cope with their grief, while maintaining their hope.
His brother Spencer still writes him letters, ending each one with the tagline, "Answer back, brother."
That's the name of Vanessa Blanch's documentary about the Metallic family.

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Til Death Do Us Part

Posted by Christina Harnett

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We've all heard the stories...couples who can't seem to live without each other.
One spouse dies and the other goes as well, within weeks, days or even hours.
There's even a name for it, Broken Heart Syndrome.
Caroline Hillier tells us about the science behind the phenomenon.
And tells us two remarkable tales of true love.

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Another Hand

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This Sunday, February 15, our friends at Land and Sea will air their documentary "The Winter Shrimp Fishery."
It's the story of a man named Mike Newell who had a vision for a winter fishery that would help his community. Now his son Alen is carrying on his Dad's dream.

We first brought you this story back in 2013.
The CBC's Eileen Mcinnis spent time on the water with Alen and his crew...and found out why they often feel there is "another hand" working with them on the boat.

Here's the radio doc that inspired the TV story.


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Something Big - The Aftermath of Protests at Fredericton High

Posted by Christina Harnett

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2014 was the year when feminism and how women are treated came roaring into public discourse.
It was also the year that a group of Fredericton High students walked out over their school's dress code.
The protest - and the punishment that followed made headlines.
And began a discussion about gender politics, morality, sexual assault - and free speech and the right to protest.
The CBC's Jacques Poitras takes us through those events last fall, in his documentary Something Big.

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House Concerts

Posted by Christina Harnett

Performers around the region - and across the country - are turning to house concerts as a place to perform.
It's a practice that goes back centuries, when most live music was performed in private homes. And it's a trend whose time has come again.
As Shelley Thompson tells us, these days it's about both the music - and the setting.

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I want to give him his rights right now...

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Pat Sobey wasn't expecting to find her foster brother on a street corner in Charlottetown.
Pat hadn't seen Jake Knockwood in decades, but when she spotted him sitting on a bench in the city's downtown, she knew she had to talk to him, to be re-united with him.
This week Kerry Campbell tells us about the reunion, and about Pat's struggle to get Jake out of Hillsborough Hospital, PEI's only psychiatric facility.
A recent report concluded half the patients living at the instituion don't belong there.
Jake has some physical and developmental issues. But Pat and others believe he deserves to live in the community.


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Sexism and Violence on Campus

Posted by Christina Harnett

Misogyny, sexism - violence on campus.
Most Canadian post-secondary institutions will talking about these subjects for some time, thanks to incidents such as the Dalhousie Dentistry scandal, the rape chant incident at Saint Mary's.
And the fact that statistics suggest between 15 and 25 per cent of all female students will be sexually assaulted during their time on campus.
On Atlantic Voice this week you can hear segments from a recent forum in Halifax about sexualized violence on campus.
Producer Christina Harnett also spoke with two people about what parents, teachers and community leaders can do to help. They were Dr Pat McGrath from Halifax's IWK Health Centre, and Rice Fuller, senior director of Health and Wellness at the University of New Brunswick.

Ask Dr Pat
Watch the forum here....

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"Weird Year" in Atlantic Canadian politics

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Last year saw a crazy game of political musical chairs in Newfoundland and Labrador...
An unexpected resignation at the top in Prince Edward Island...
A battle between the government and big unions in Nova Scotia...
And a brand new government intent on making big changes in New Brunswick.
So...what's ahead in 2015?
This week on Atlantic Voice, Pauline Dakin talks to provincial affairs reporters in all four provinces.

Listen here...

Silent Teacher

Posted by Christina Harnett

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When Mary-Louise Vandeburg decided she would donate her body to science, her family was taken off guard.
Her daughter Peg especially had trouble with the decision her beloved mother had made.
So when Mary-Louise passed away, Peg wrote a letter to the medical students who would benefit from her mother's gift.
In 2007 Pauline Dakin made a documentary about Mary-Louise, Peg and the Human Body Donation program at Dalhousie University. We recently re-aired that piece, along with an update from Dr Dr George Kovacs, the director of the Clinical Cadaver Program at Dalhousie.

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Year End Reporter's Notebook

Posted by Christina Harnett

This has become an annual event for us, and actually one of our favourite shows of the year...we ask our colleagues at CBC/Radio Canada to reflect back on the year that was, and tell us about something that happened to them.
Not necessarily the stories themselves, but the people they met or the things they learned while they were out in the field.
After all, for a lot of us that's the best thing about being a reporter...getting to meet scores of interesting people, go to places you wouldn't normally get to, and tell stories that might otherwise go unheard.

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The Art of Conversation

Posted by Christina Harnett


Earlier this year the Walrus Foundation held an event at Mount Allison University in Sackville, New Brunswick called The Walrus Talks:The Art of Conversation.
It featured some of the most interesting and accomplished women in Canada.
Speakers included journalist Sally Armstrong, historian Charlotte Gray, author Lisa Moore and RCMP superintendent Marlene Snowman...who was the spokesperson for the force during the shootings in Moncton last June.
There were others as well, and we wish we could included them all!
To see more go to The Walrus.
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Left Behind

Posted by Christina Harnett

You would probably be surprised by the number of families in our region dealing with the mysterious disappearance of a loved one...
People who were living ordinary lives, doing routine things, until it would seem they simply - vanished.
Left behind are the families... fathers, mothers, children, siblings, and friends.
Reporter Yvonne Colbert has covered missing person stories for years, and always wondered what happened after the cameras and microphones left.
This week on Atlantic Voice, she introduces us to three families in that situation.

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Stranger In The Kitchen

Posted by Christina Harnett

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For much of the last three decades, Laura Uhlman and her family have spent most nights sharing their home with strangers.
The Uhlmans are from Bridgewater, Nova Scotia.
Laura, a mother and a grandmother, has a habit of inviting people in need to sleep at her place.
Sometimes it's just for a night, sometimes longer.
Reporter Mary-Catherine McIntosh introduces us to Laura and her family in this week's documentary.


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O Christmas Tree

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This Christmas people in Alberta, in New York and in Panama will gather around a tree grown here in the Maritimes.
During November, more than a million trees left Nova Scotia alone, bound for markets across North America, and into the Carribean.
It's been that way for decades, though growers have been through some tough times, as the high Canadian dollar cut into their profits.
Now, with the loonie down, prospects are looking up.
This week the CBC's Jennifer Henderson heads into the woods for a look at the challenges, facing the Christmas tree industry, and why some growers think this is their year.

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"What can we do better to have education be the great equalizer it was meant to be?"

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Many parents are making a financial sacrifice for their children's education, either through private tutoring - or private schools.
However Dean of Education at Memorial University, Dr Kirk Anderson, says public education in this country is solid.
Pointing to the recent minister's review on Education in Nova Scotia, Dr Jamie Metsala says some parents are, however, clearly unhappy with the education their children are getting.
Dr Metsala is the Gail and Stephen Jarislowsky Chair in Learning Disabilities at Mount St Vincent University in Halifax.
Pauline Dakin spoke with her and Dr Anderson on this week's Atlantic Voice. We also heard from high school teacher - and public education advocate - Ben Sichel.

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Shift in Expectations

Posted by Christina Harnett

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(Kids at Riverbend School in Moncton)

There have been private schools in Atlantic Canada for generations, mostly used by wealthy families or people with strong religious ties.
But this week, the CBC's Vanessa Blanch tells us why some middle and lower income parents are taking a financial hit to avoid the public education system.
And she takes us to some of the new private schools that have opened to meet that demand.

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Mind the Gap

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Every year students across the region take standardized tests to check on their math skills, their literacy levels and outcomes in science.
Then the results come out and governments and school boards wring their hands about the scores, announce some reviews and make new plans.
Meanwhile some educators and administrators continue to quietly work away, trying to solve the problem of the "achievement gap" - why some kids succeed at school and some just don't.
It turns out the answer to that question has a lot to do with what happens to a child before he or she even gets to school.
Next week we'll hear why so many parents are turning away from the public system.
But this week we bring back Lezlie Lowe's documentary from September 2011.

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Her Father's Spirit

Posted by Christina Harnett

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David J. Brooks made a name for himself as one of the first contemporary Mi'kmaq artists in Nova Scotia.
He dedicated his life to art, and shared his passion with his two daughters, Sarah and Chelsea.
Although, he never wanted his creative vision to shape theirs.
David's sudden death deeply affected this close-knit family.
And marked a turning point in his eldest daughter's life.
Now, Chelsea Brooks is committed to making a living from her art while bringing her own flair to the canvas.

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You can see more photos of Chelsea and her dad on the Atlantic Voice Facebook page.

The Smell of Money

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Jobs versus the environment...wealth versus health.
For generations that's the choice many rural communities across the region have had to make.
This week guest host Harry Forestell looks at the tricky issue of balancing economic growth with protecting the environment.
We also hear a report from Pictou, Nova Scotia, where this past summer residents decided they could no longer put up with emissions from the local pulp mill.

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No Fat Jokes Here

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Eat less, move more.
If it was actually that easy to lose weight everyone would do it.
Instead we have a multi-billion dollar diet industry, an obesity crisis - and a health care system with few tools to help people who need to change their lifestyle.
Pauline Dakin spoke with Dr Arya Sharma, one of the country's leading obesity researchers.
He's trying to dispel some of the myths about weight gain, and he's using comedy to get his message across.

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The "Business" of Universities

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Are students "customers" at the universities they attend? Should they be?
How should schools be funded...and how much of that money should come from private business?
Those are just some of the questions tackled in part two of our series about the future of universities in Atlantic Canada.
We were invited to record a symposium sponsored by the Royal Society of Canada.

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University of the Future

Posted by Christina Harnett

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There are sixteen universities in Atlantic Canada, with more than 75,000 students, and millions of dollars in public money.
That makes them big business in this region.
But what should be the "business" of the University in the 21st century?
That was the question posed to six important thinkers as at recent symposium held by the Royal Society of Canada.
This week we bring you part one of that discussion.

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Poet Laureate of Youth Now

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This week on Atlantic Voice, we meet Aidan Cromwell, in prison for second degree murder.
Once a week he calls a radio station to read his poetry on the air...and because of him, some other prisoners are now doing the same.
The fact is that Aidan killed a man, devastating his victim's family, and his own.
Still some people, including his father Dave, see a spark of hope in Aidan's writing.
(Click on the link below)


Sable Island Diary

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Sable Island is one of those places many people dream of visiting, though few ever will.
A 42 kilometre strip of sand in the Atlantic, it's the most remote part of Nova Scotia.
There is only one full-time resident, along with a changing cast of researchers and other workers. It's home to dozens of grey seals, hundreds of shipwrecks...and an iconic population of wild horses.
It's also Canada's newest national park reserve. And earlier this month CBC Halifax broadcast the first ever live radio program from there.
This week we hear the CBC's Eileen McInnis' audio diary from that trip.

Listen here
Sable Island: A Living Treasure

Symphony of Ghosts

Posted by Christina Harnett

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We all know the feeling...you get to the end of a good book, and wish it could keep on going.
Dan MacCormack figured out one way to make that happen.
The young singer-songwriter - and father of two - spent six years making an album based entirely on the novels of his favourite writer.
And not just any writer...David Adams Richards, one of the country's most celebrated literary figures.

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Dan's page

Annie Clair

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This week on Atlantic Voice, we launch our new season with a story from activist, journalist, mother and grandmother Annie Clair.
During the summer an increasing number of people have called on the federal government to hold a public inquiry into the numbers of missing and murdered aboriginal women in this country
It was one of the items on the agenda at the Premier's conference in Charlottetown - and most recently it looks as though the government will participate in a round-table on the issue
Annie Clair is waiting for something to happen
Originally from Elsipogtog, New Brunswick, Annie talked to three native families dealing with the loss of a loved one. And she talks about her own experience as an aboriginal woman.

Blood Ties

Posted by Christina Harnett

In 2011, the Federal government created the Qalipu Mi'kmaq First Nation, a brand new, landless band.
Members would be recognized as status Indians and be entitled to benefits.
More than one hundred thousand people applied, shocking government officials.
Now, thousands of people who say they can prove they are of Mi'kmaq ancestry, are having their applications rejected.
Hector Pearce is one of them, and he's leading the group's bid for recognition.
Leigh Anne Power brings us the story...

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D-Day Anniversary

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week on Atlantic Voice, memories from the Invasion of Normandy.
Amid all the official ceremonies and events this week to mark the seventieth anniversary of D-day, we'll hear stories from men who were there, members of the North Nova Scotia Highlanders, many of whom were just teenagers in 1944.
Former CBC reporter Rob North recorded their stories more than ten years ago. This week we are re-playing his documentary from 2003.


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Hidden Horrors

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week the CBC's Angela MacIvor brings us a project in conjunction with CBC Investigates.
It's about two nurses from Truro, Nova Scotia who began counselling victims of what they call "non-state torture" about twenty years ago.
Now they want the Criminal Code changed to recognize what they say those victims are facing.

"Without Seal There Would Be No Me"

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Billy Gauthier is a celebrated Inuit carver from Labrador.
In fact, he can hardly work fast enough to keep up with demand from the galleries that sell his art.
But this spring, Billy and his girlfriend, Kara, are taking the slow road to creating something they've never made before.
It began with a day out on the ice, hunting seal the traditional way, with a harpoon.
The CBC's John Gaudi brings us their story.

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The Case of the Disappearing Small Towns

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week on the show we look at how some towns, villages and outports are reacting to their shrinking populations - and declining tax bases.
Resettlement has come up again in some areas of Newfoundland and Labrador. That's where people are basically paid to leave their homes forever.
And in several Nova Scotia communities, councillors have voted to give up their town status.
Pauline speaks with three guests for a sense of the challenges facing towns in rural Atlantic Canada.

Searching For Their Roots

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This week we meet some people who are struggling to find out more about their "first chapter", their origins.
All three are adopted, and they want access to their original birth certficates and adoption records.
But the law surrounding access to that information differ in each Atlantic province.
The CBC's Jennifer Henderson has our story this week.

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A Friendly Invasion

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This week we go from a retirement community in a Florida trailer park - to an abandoned US Military base in St Anthony, Newfoundland.
We hear how the influx of American servicemen to outport communities decades ago, had an effect that's still being felt today.
The CBC's Caroline Hillier brings us the story.

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Changing Trains

Posted by Christina Harnett

Motherhood can be a maze of complex emotions, from euphoric highs to crushing lows.
It's been called the best job in the world...and the toughest.
Sometimes it's both, at the same time.
The CBC's Sarah Keaveny Vos brings us the story of a mother from Charlottetown who was forced to face her deepest fear, and ended up learning the greatest lessons of her life.

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* Catherine will be starting her new blog this week. We'll post a link when it's ready.

Bàocháng (Quid pro quo) Chinese Students in Halifax

Posted by Christina Harnett

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(picture courtesy David Zhang)

This week the CBC's Margot Brunelle brings us a story about why universities in the region are courting foreign students, and what those students bring to the cities in which they live.
Halifax has six universities, and the largest population of Chinese-born students in Atlantic Canada.
As you can imagine, that's something to which local businesses are paying close attention.


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A House Built To Last

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This week Pauline visits Larry and Sally Messenger at their fully accessible home in Mineville, Nova Scotia.

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Accents

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Why is it some people never lose their accents, no matter how far from home they live?
Rex Murphy comes to mind, or Mark Critch.
Meanwhile others pick up accents wherever they go.
They may live in Canada all their lives, but suddenly a trip to London has them speaking like Prince William.
On Atlantic Voice we're looking for the answers to those questions and more.
The topic is accents, and how they shape our identities when we are away from home.
Our guests are writer Lynn Coady, actor Cathy Jones and Dr Michael Kiefte from Dalhousie's Accent Modification Clinic


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Chief Gregory Rich

Posted by Christina Harnett

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A tragedy born of addiction and neglect devastated the former community of Davis Inlet twenty-two years ago.

It was also a turning point in Gregory Rich's life. All five of his children died that night while he and his wife were at a Valentine's Dance.

Shortly after his election last fall, Chief Rich talked to the CBC's Kate Adach about how he managed to keep going afterwards.

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Home and Alone

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Traditionally in Atlantic Canada, when someone needs help, family and friends rally around.
But with an aging population, a more transient population - and an increasing number of immigrants without established supports, that may not always be possible.
This week on Atlantic Voice,the story of two people in New Brunswick who need 24 hour care and the lengths they and their families are going to find it.

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Re-Wiring Our Kids Part 2

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This week Pauline brings us more startling research about the way technology is affecting our brains.
All those hours spent looking at smartphones and other devices doesn't just have an
impact on attention spans.
It may actually be causing physiological changes, especially among young people.
She also looks at how the rise of the Internet - and the prevalence of reality tv - have affected the way young people perceive fame.

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Re-Wiring Our Kids

Posted by Christina Harnett

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American data shows teenagers consume an average of almost 11 hours of digital media every day.
A Canadian survey from 2012 shows teens use their smart phones... not ipads or laptops or tvs, just their phones...an average of five hours a day on school days.
So what affect is all that technology having on brains that are still developing?
This week on Atlantic Voice, Pauline Dakin speaks to some of North America's leading thinkers on the issue.

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Moncton High

Posted by Christina Harnett

Over the next couple of weeks Atlantic Voice is launching a series about the long term effects technology is having on our kids.
Host Pauline Dakin travelled across North America to speak with leading researchers on the subject.
And some of what she found was, frankly, disturbing.
But one of the things that first got her interested in the topic was the story of two teachers at Moncton High.
And how, dismayed at what they were seeing in school, they tried to get their students re-engaged in the community.

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Keeping Seniors At Home

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Dr Don Shiner and his team spent seven years - and more than a million dollars - talking to seniors here and around the world.
They looked at why so many people want to stay in their homes as long as possible...and why so few are able to do it properly.
They compiled all their research, came up with some basic conclusions, and straightforward recommendations.
And then.....nothing happened.
This week we check in with Dr Shiner about the kinds of things he thinks we should be doing to help seniors.

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Dr C

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Nikhil Joshi should have spent the last several months enjoying his work and life like any other 27 year old.
He was a resident in internal medicine in St John's, and had a busy, active social life.
But last fall Nikhil found out he had cancer...and so the intervening months have been spent getting chemotherapy, and dealing with his diagnosis.
He has also spent the time talking to Canadians about his experiences, on his blog and on the radio.
And as more and more people engaged in a dialogue with him, he became more and more open.
Here is his story, from diagnosis to the end of treatment.

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Atlantic Kon Tiki

Posted by Christina Harnett


An obscure but heroic page of Canadian maritime history will soon be commemorated at Halifax Harbour.
The developer of a condominimum project called "Kings Wharf" in Dartmouth, plans to make sure residents and visitors don't forget a man named Henri Beaudout.
Beaudout was the skipper of a daring transatlantic raft crossing in 1956, from Halifax to Falmouth, England.
The feat, accomplished in 88 days, is not celebrated in Canada.
Beaudot recently met with Kings Landing developer,Francis Faras,who promised to install a plaque at the site where the raft departed.
St. John's producer Marie Wadden has also met Beaudout, and learned there's more known about his voyage in England, where he landed, than here in Canada.

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Perilous Wait

Posted by Christina Harnett

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In many places - including Newfoundland and Labrador - people who want gender reassignment surgery can get some part of it covered under the provincial health plan.
But in Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island and New Brunswick, people have to travel for the procedures, and pay for it themselves.
That can cost about ten thousand dollars - at a minimum.

The issue heated up recently in Nova Scotia after the former NDP government said it would NOT pay. And then said it would.
Last fall's election put that promise on hold.
Meanwhile, people who want the surgery continue to wait...something that statistics suggest can be very dangerous.

Freelance reporter Maggie Rahr brings us the story...

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Deer Island Love Story

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Averosa Esperagoza-Leslie never expected to marry a Canadian.
But then she never expected to wind up in Deer Island, New Brunswick either.
Averosa is one of dozens of Filipino immigrants who've come to work at the lobster processing plant on Deer Island, in the Bay of Fundy.
As the population of the Island has declined, the plant has had trouble finding local workers.
Now it's thriving, and the community - including Averosa's husband Grant - has welcomed its new residents.
The CBC's Matthew Bingley spent time on Deer Island this past fall.

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Family of Fathers

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Today we are welcoming listeners from Newfoundland and Labrador!
We are so pleased to have you with us, as we bring you documentaries and stories from reporters across Atlantic Canada each Sunday morning, and here on the web.
For our listeners in New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia...it's the same show, just a different name to reflect our growing audience and the stories from those communities we hope to share.

To start things off we go to Happy Valley Goose Bay, in Labrador, behind the counters of the busiest coffee shop in town, and into the living rooms of the growing Filipino community there.
Workers come to start a new life for themselves in Newfoundland and Labrador, a province that's actively encouraging immigration.
But as many Atlantic Canadians already know, the sacrifice of leaving home for a better paying job is no small matter.
The CBC's John Gaudi got to know a group of men, fathers all, who are dealing with the reality of watching their children grow up - over Skype.

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Middle of Somewhere

Posted by Christina Harnett

Vance Glover has recovered quite a bit since the car accident that left him with a brain injury more than fourteen years ago.

But the Millvale, Prince Edward Island man is still waiting for something...he's waiting to remember the daughter he lost that day.

Doctors say Vance may never fully remember her - and that maybe it's better this way.

This week on Maritime Magazine, the CBC's Julia Cook tells us Vance's story in her documentary, Middle of Somewhere.

The Sad Tale of Maggie Vail

Posted by Christina Harnett

It's a tale that's been passed down through songs and stories....a part of the folklore of Saint John, New Brunswick.

But the tragedy surrounding the death of Sarah Margaret Vail and her baby, Ella Mae, has touched off a very modern response.

Sarah Trainor tells us about a group of people - including a police officer, and a Vail descendant - who believe she should be remembered now.

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Bringing a Dog To Heal

Posted by Christina Harnett

Medric Cousineau is a retired airforce navigator who started having symptoms of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder after a perilous rescue effort at sea.
For more than two and a half decades, Medric struggled to get his life under control, trying treament after treatment, in search of a therapy that would ease the endless anguish.
Nothing worked...until he was paired with a service dog named Thai about 18 months ago.
The change was SO dramatic, Medric resolved to find a way to provide service dogs to other vets living with PTSD.
This past summer he took a long walk to Ottawa to raise awareness and money for the cause.
The walk is now done, but the work is not. Carmen Klassen has our story.


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Stories from Remarkable Women

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This week Pauline Dakin brings us conversations with six remarkable women, who are all making a difference in the world.

In each case, the women were following one path when something happened that lead them in a new direction.

They spoke about their lives as part of a panel Pauline hosted last month, in which she got to channel her inner Oprah and ask the women about their "aha" moments.

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Remembering Okanagan

Posted by Christina Harnett

In 1973 the Canadian submarine HMCS Okanagan came within inches of catastrophe.
A British tanker ran over it, tearing into the coning tower, tossing the submarine sideways and back....while the entire crew was inside.
Forty years later, a group of of those submariners from the Okanagan got together.... to remember the past - and to talk about the future of the service they love so much.
A service that has been overshadowed by controversy in the last few years.
Stephen Puddicombe joined them, and then joined Pauline in studio.



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Kate and Ken Stannix

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Easter Sunday 2007 was one of Canada's bloodiest days in Afghanistan.
Six Canadian soldiers were killed when the light armoured vehicle they were in hit a roadside bomb, about 75 kilometers west of Kandahar City.
One of them was Master Corporal Christopher Stannix, 24 years old, a reservist with the Princess Louise Fusiliers in Halifax.
His mother Kate is the Silver Cross Mother in McAdam, New Brunswick during Remembrance Day Ceremonies this year.
His father Ken has rarely talked to the media about their loss.
They both spoke at length to the CBC's Myfanwy Davies recently, about their son and how they've coped with the tragedy of his death.

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Getting the Compassion back

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week we hear some reponses to Penny Ericson's report about the care her husband received at the Dr Everett Chalmers Regional Hospital in Fredericton.

And the head of the Candian Medical Association gives us his thoughts on why "patient-centred care" is an idea whose time has come.

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Penny Ericson

Posted by Christina Harnett

Carl Ericson spent the last seven months of his life in a hospital, and his wife Penny was with him the entire time.
She was well qualified to play a role in her husband's care; Penny is a retired nurse and nursing professor from Fredericton.
But while Carl was in the Dr Everett Chalmers hospital, Penny wasn't just looking after him, she was taking notes about their experience on the other side of the health care system.
And it wasn't pretty.
In September, Penny released a scathing report, outlining the problems she saw - complete with examples - and suggested solutions.
Pauline spoke with her last week.

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The Main Monk

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Followers of Unvirtuous Abbey on Twitter and Facebook are used to seeing prayers such as...
"For those who say that they've made a 360 degree change, when they mean 180,....we pray."
And, "For automatic sliding doors that make you feel like a Jedi, we give thanks. Amen."
And, "For those who are living in a powder keg and giving off sparks, we pray."

Unvirtuous Abbey is a social media phenomenon,describing itself on Facebook as "Digital monks praying for people with first world problems."
Freelance reporter Dave Atkinson introduces us to the man behind the account, Moncton's Aaron Billard.

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The Rev. Aaron C Billard

Listen here to our interview with Rev. Lawrence DeWolfe from the Atlantic School of Theology

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In the Chair, Out of the Box

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Gerry Post spent his career helping businesses and governments find solutions to their problems.
When he came up against the ultimate personal challenge himself, he decided to tackle it in the same straightforward way.
Now he also tries to help other people in his new-found community.
Documentary prducer Dick Miller brings us Gerry's story.

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Long Way Home

Posted by Christina Harnett

Kate MacEachern may not be part of the Canadian military anymore, but she's still marching for her comrades.

MacEachern is doing her second charity walk in as many years...last year she raised $20,000 in support of physical rehabilitation for injured veterans.

This year she is rasing money and awareness for the cause of PTSD - or post traumatic stress disorder.

The difference is, MacEachern - a trained tank driver - is no longer employed by the Canadian Forces herself.

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An Insider's Guide to Elections

Posted by Christina Harnett

Once "the writ is dropped" and "we're away to the races" all the cliches and canned images are trotted out.

But what really goes on in the backrooms and on the campaign trails?

And how should you - the voter - filter through the noise to make your decision?

We find out from former candidates and political veterans in our documentary this week.

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Hidden Homes

Posted by Christina Harnett

In every city there are rooming houses - buildings subdivided into dozens of small rooms, and rented, usually to men with addiction or mental health issues.

But in Halifax, even these meagre accommodations are disappearing as properties are sold and redeveloped.

So the problem becomes...what to do with the people who were living there?

Freelance reporter Lezlie Lowe finds out in our first documentary of the new season.

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A Normal Teenager

Posted by Christina Harnett

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(Michael Nowlan, photo credit: Kirsten Gargan)


We hear so many awful stories of bullying in schools and online, kids targeting each other with a seemingly off-hand cruelty.

Many high school students could be forgiven for just wanting to fit in - or fade into the background.

But that's not Michael Nowlan's way.

The Dieppe, New Brunswick teenager is openly gay, and often wears skirts and heels to class. He's also one of the most popular kids in school.

Michael graduates this year, and his teachers say he will leave a legacy of tolerance and kindness behind.

The CBC's Jonna Brewer brings us the story.

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Into The Woods....

Posted by Christina Harnett

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(Director Lisa Brown and some students at the Tir Na Nog Forest School in Roachville, New Brunswick.)


We all know Canadian kids need to be more active.
Now there's a growing movement to get them out into nature for a large part of their day.
The trend - called Forest Schools - has already caught on in Northern Europe, and one of the movement's leading proponents is a Maritimer.
The CBC's Connell Smith brings us the story.


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Looking After People with Intellectual Disabilities

Posted by Christina Harnett

Recently we have been looking at some of the issues surrounding the care and treatment for people with intellectual disabilities.

Margot Brunelle brought us a story about the difficulty finding appropriate housing for people who often display aggressive behaviour.

But there is another problem; even in the facilties that exist, the level of training for people who work there may not be meeting their clients' needs.

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Frank McKenna on Petroleum Pipelines

Posted by Christina Harnett

The former premier of New Brunswick - and current deputy chair of Toronto Dominion Bank of Canada - has been talking about the need for cross-provincial pipelines.

Frank McKenna believes the delays in constructing pipes to carry Alberta oil products to new markets is costing the country dearly.

He spoke with Maritime Magazine's Harry Forestell last week.

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The Right House

Posted by Christina Harnett

26 year old Nichelle Benn is looking for a home...but not just any home.

At a time when most young people her age are striking out on their own, Nichelle choices are mostly out of her control.

She has an intellectual disability that makes it impossible to live with her own family.

But she's convinced the large facility she's currently living in isn't right for her either.

The CBC's Margot Brunelle looks at the struggle to find appropriate housing for people with disabilities.

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The Mutti Journals; A Mother's Legacy

Posted by Christina Harnett

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In 1939 Asta Jacob sent her young daughter, Ilsa out of Nazi Germany.

It was the last time they would see each other, though Ilsa, alone in England, tried not to give up hope.

All through the war she read and re-read her mother's letters, and started a journal to keep a record of everything that was happening to her, in hopes of one day sharing it with her Mutti, her mother Asta.

Reporter Pam Berman brings us a documentary about Ilsa's life, told through Asta's letters, Ilsa's journals... and the memories of her daughter Judith.

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In His Head

Posted by Christina Harnett

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We all get headaches from time to time, but for most of us it's an issue that goes away with a couple of aspirin and a good sleep.

Richard Levangie has had headaches, migraines actually, almost daily since 1993.

Christina Harnett brings us Richard's story of loss - and gain - over the last twenty years.


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Talking to Rita

Posted by Christina Harnett

People have been paying tribute to the late Rita MacNeil, a true icon in the Canadian music industry, and as many have noted, her life was anything but easy.

In her early years she struggled as a single mother, facing poverty, abuse and at times, addiction issues.

However something about the way she handled all her challenges inspired others, and endeared her to millions of music fans.

The CBC's Steve Sutherland spoke with Rita MacNeil in 2009, about her role as a leader in her community.

Steve joined Harry to talk about that meeting.


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Pros and Cons of a West-East Pipeline

Posted by Christina Harnett

It's Open Season for people who might have an interest in shipping Alberta bitumen from East Coast ports.
For the next few months, TransCanada Corp is looking for solid expressions of interest surrounding its plan to have a West -East pipeline, from Alberta, perhaps all the way to New Brunswick.
The Irvings support the idea, as does the New Brunswick government.
This week Harry Forestell talks to three guests about the potential advantages - and pitfalls - of the proposal.

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Transgender Students on Prince Edward Island

Posted by Christina Harnett

Jay Jonah and Trevor Williams have a lot in common.
They both go to school at the University of Prince Edward Island.
They were both born female, but now identify as male.
And, because of that, they both face challenges many of us would never think about...such as which public bathroom to use.
This week on Maritime Magazine, the CBC's Julia Cook talks to Jay and Trevor about the struggle to re-define themselves, in a society that only sees people as male or female.

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Two Flocks (One Shepherd)

Posted by Christina Harnett

The Revered Kevin Little is minister at St Luke's United Church in Upper Tantallon, Nova Scotia, in the suburbs of Halifax.
He also looks after Brunswick Street United, a tiny congregation in the heart of Halifax's innner city.
It's a leap, but as freelancer Philip Moscovitch found out, these two flocks both reflect the way Rev. Little sees the world.

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Bullies At Work (Another Look)

Posted by Christina Harnett

They cost millions of dollars in lost productivity and stress...and it seems like there's one in every workplace.
A recent Executive MBA Grad - and school teacher - from PEI has been looking at how cases of bullying in the workplace make their way through the court system.
And how employers - and maybe even governments - can take a lesson from how schools are handling the issue.


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Another Hand

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This week on Maritime Magazine the story of a father's legacy and a lifeline for a rural community.
Twenty years ago few people talked about local food or sustainability.
But Mike Newall saw potential in the waters of Nova Scotia's Chedabucto Bay.
Now his son Alen is watching his father's dream of a sustainable fishery come true.
The CBC's Eileen McInnis put together our documentary, "Another Hand."

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Kids and Mental Illness

Posted by Christina Harnett

Recently New Brunswick reporter Vanessa Blanch brought us the story of a mother and her son struggling to find appropriate care for his mental illness.
Andrew Carter is 17 years old, he has bipolar disorder, and he sits on the autism spectrum.
His mother,Vickie, has spent years trying to get the treatment she believes would help him...to no avail.
We also heard how Vickie and Andrew are not alone...a 2009 report authored by New Brunswick judge Michael McKee outlined the need to overhaul the province's mental health services.
This week Vanessa brings us an update.

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Dragon Kings

Posted by Christina Harnett

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In 2007 the federal government started bringing over thousands of refugees from U.N-led camps in Nepal.

The refugees are from Bhutan, and they were forced out of that country in the early 1990s, meaning some of them spent their entire lives in the camps until they came to Canada.

In Halifax, about 350 or so Nepali-speaking Bhutanese are quietly settling into the community, but they're carrying a huge burden, and it's falling partly on the shoulders of the young people.

Freelance reporter Maggie Rahr brings us the story.

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I Need Help Now...

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week Vanessa Blanch brings us the stories of two families - two young people - struggling with mental illness.

She explores how far we have come when it comes to awareness and overcoming the stigma....at how very far we have to go - when it comes to treating mental health problems.

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Gun Violence Pt 2

Posted by Christina Harnett

The region's biggest city has always had its share of violent crime - it's something that goes along with being a major port.
But during the last five years guns have become more common at crime scenes. And the number of shootings in Halifax has risen to an all-time high.
To tackle the problem, the city is looking to other jurisdictions for help.
This week Maritime Magazine looks at one crime-fighting model from the US, and ask whether we should be looking for solutuions beyond our borders.

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Dr Ivar Mendez

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week Pauline sits down for a feature interview with a super-star of the medical world, Dr Ivar Mendez.
He's a leading figure in neuroscience and a pioneer in the use of robotics to help provide better medical care to remote areas.
Now he's leaving the region, and heading West.

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Gun Violence in Halifax

Posted by Christina Harnett

Twenty years ago - even ten years ago - it was rare for a police officer in the region's largest city to find a gun at a crime scene.

Now it's becoming distressingly common.

This week Maritime Magazine producer Christina Harnett looks at the issue of gun violence in the Nova Scotia capital; how it evolved, who's doing the crimes, and what law enforcement officials are doing about it.


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The Forest and the Trees

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week freelancer writer Chris Benjamin brings us a story about the delicate balance between managing jobs in the forestry industry...and managing the ecology of the forest.

In Nova Scotia, decades old leases negotiated between forestry companies and the provinicial government led to clear-cutting on crown land.

The end of those leases - and the election of an NDP government - led many environmentalists to see a golden opportunity, a chance to move toward a more sustainable industry.

But so far they say it isn't happening.

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What's So Great About Shrew Spit?

Posted by Christina Harnett

2012 was a banner year for a small New Brunswick company that made its name ...with shrew spit.

Soricimed Biopharma Inc. began after a biochemist discovered that the venomous saliva of the rodents in his backyard seemed to kill ovarian cancer cells.

Dr Jack Stewart was teaching at Mt Allison at the time.

Now, more than ten years later the drug his company developed from that initial discovery is undergoing human trials.

Pauline has been following the Soricimed story for the last several years. This week we get an update.


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Year End Show

Posted by Christina Harnett

Usually at the end of the year, programs such as ours look back at the most memorable stories they're covered.

Instead we decided to do something a bit different; we invited our colleagues from across the region to tell us about the people they met or the things that happened to them while out in the field this year.

The stories are touching, funny and - in some cases - very unexpected, and we hope to make this an annual tradition.

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Sunday's Church

Posted by Christina Harnett

For forty years former residents of Africville, their children and grandchildren have gathered at the site where the community was destroyed in the 1960s.

They hold their reunions in a tent, in what is now on off-leash dog park.

Meanwhile a replica of the little white church that was bulldozed, exists as a museum and a monument to what was lost.

This week on Maritime Magazine, author and journalist Jon Tattrie tells us about the hopes and dreams tied up in the church, about a woman named Sunday who is hoping to make them a reality.

And about the night, recently, when the community finally came together there...

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Phoenix Re-visited

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week Maritime Magazine checks in with members of the Phoenix Community Choir.

When we met them last year, they were just starting out and some of the members had never sung in front of other people.

Many of them are at risk or homeless teenagers, who came through the Phoenix House shelter in Halifax.

Thanks to a collaboration with the choir at Bishop's University in Quebec - and its energetic director - the two groups came together to give several power-house performances.

Now, a year later, the Phoenix group is still performing, including this week with Symphony Nova Scotia. (Scroll below for the documentaries from last year about the choir.)

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Living with Our History Pt 2

Posted by Christina Harnett

This region has a long and colourful heritage. But how good are we at telling our entire history?

Recently Maritime Magazine talked about some of the historical figures on our plaques and pedestals, and whether we would still honour them if we knew everything they'd done

This week, in the second of a two part series, the show looks at how to tell more of the whole story of the region.

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Camp Mini Ha Ha

Posted by Christina Harnett


Every Fall, for more than 10 years miniaturists from Canada, the US and the UK have gathered in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia.


They spend 5 days building miniature replicas of real-life objects at a place they call Camp Mini Ha Ha.
It's the brainchild of three people, Debbie Parrot and Cheryl Hartlen from Nova Scotia - and Marcy Cumberland from the US.
About 30 campers go every year, and while men are welcome, so far most of them have been women.
Writer, actor and regular CBC contributor Jackie Torrens, has a thing for people whose interests are off the beaten path.
We sent her to Mini Camp for two days, and there she found that big revelations can be had, even in a world so small....


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Living with Our History

Posted by Christina Harnett

Across the Maritimes there are plaques, statues, place names and school names honouring the region's colonial heroes.

But how much do most of us know about people such as Colonial Robert Monkton, or Lord Andrew Rollo or Geoffrey Amherst?

And if we DID know all about them...would we still want to celebrate them?

This week on Maritime Magazine, an amateur history sleuth finds out the story behind one of the plaques in Halifax's Victorian-era Public Gardens. And a local historian looks at the issues inherent in celebrating our colonial past.


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Climbing The Hill

Posted by Christina Harnett


Five years ago, when tragedy struck Janet Ogilvie, she didn't know how she would keep going.
In many ways her life stopped that day....it felt like her heart had stopped.
But a chance meeting with a young man from Prince Edward Island, set her on a path to a new life...on a farm, far from her Ontario home.
Sunday on Maritime Magazine reporter Sarah Keaveny-Vos brings us Janet's story.

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Farmer Dave

Posted by Christina Harnett

As the harvest comes in, farmers are taking stock of their growing season, tallying up the figures and deciding if they can make a go of it for another year.

For more and more people that answer is no...according to Statistics Canada, the number of farms in the country is shrinking and the ones left are becoming larger and more corporate.

Meanwhile the average age of farmers is fifty-five or older.

This week on Maritime Magazine we'll meet a man who's bucking both trends.
Freelancer Lorne Daltrop brings us a profile of New Brunswick's Dave Wolpin.

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North Mountain Hippies

Posted by Christina Harnett

It's been about forty years since a wave of - mostly American - young people came up to live in the woods of Atlantic Canada.
They settled in remote parts of PEI, New Brunwsick,...and on the North Mountain in Nova Scotia.
They came to get away from a government they'd lost faith in, a war they didn't believe in, and a society they felt had grown too commercial.
This past summer, Maritime Magazine host Pauline Dakin attended a reunion of the North Mountain Community....group of former "Back to the landers" who had lived there communal style in the 1970s.


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Walk the Talk

Posted by Christina Harnett

A generation ago, most children walked to school. Now, in some communities, it's fewer than two out of every ten kids

There are plenty of reasons for the change...and this week reporter Lezlie Lowe looks at several of them.

She also takes us along on something called a "walking school bus", and finds out how walking can affect a kid's happiness.

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Where There's Smoke....

Posted by Christina Harnett

The death last spring of well-known activist Raymond Taavel sent the city of Halifax into mourning.
Grief turned to anger when news broke that his accused killer may have been out of a forensic hospital on a temporary pass, the kind of pass many patients request so they can smoke.
Now the province says it will allow smoking again on those hospital grounds, a decision critics maintain is a step backward.
In her documentary, reporter Mackenzie Grisdale looks at one suggestion for another way forward.


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Childhood Immunizations

Posted by Christina Harnett

Measles, chicken pox, whooping cough...they used to be considered rites of passage for Canadian children.

During the last four decades, with the advent of childhood immunizations, it's been much more rare to see kids coming down with these ailments.

Now New Brunswick is dealing with an outbreak of pertussis, and officials in Quebec are still trying to understand why cases of measles more than doubled last year.

The reasons behind these outbreaks are complicated - like the viruses themselves, but researchers are concerned about the trend among some parents to NOT vaccinate their children.

Host Pauline Dakin speaks with Dr Joanne Langley from the Canadian Centre for Vaccinology.

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Sight Unseen - Stories about Scars

Posted by Christina Harnett

Shins. Shoulders. And skulls....
Nearly everyone has a scar story. But not everyone's scars are small.
Nor their effects.
Scars can change lives. Make lives. And break them.
But no matter how fixed, and no matter how permanent, scars evolve.
And with them, the lives of their holders.
Freelance broadcaster Lezlie Lowe brings us stories behind scars in her documentary "Sight Unseen.:

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Leaders in Their Fields

Posted by Christina Harnett

For the next several weeks, Maritime Magazine in the Summer is playing a series of interviews from our colleagues in Cape Breton.

Please click here for more information.

The Pain of Addiction

Posted by Christina Harnett

Last week on Maritime Magazine, the CBC's Margot Brunelle introduced us to Amy Graves, a young woman whose life changed forever when her brother died after mixing alcohol with the drug dilaudid.

Amy became an activist, making noise - and enemies - in her efforts to bring awareness to the issue of prescription drug abuse.

This week, in part two of her series, Margot introduces us to two people who know first-hand the perils of that kind of addiction....and who challenge our stereotypes about what an addict looks like.

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Amy's War on Drugs

Posted by Christina Harnett

Amy Graves never meant to be a crusader.

But when her brother Josh died...after mixing alcohol and the precription drug dilaudid.... Amy's whole life changed.

Convinced that her brother's death was no accident...and could have been prevented, Amy became a thorn in the sides of police, doctors - and even the local drug dealers.

The CBC's Margot Brunelle brings us Amy's story.

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Richard Colson

Posted by Christina Harnett

Richard Colson has been in court many times; he's spent nearly his entire life behind bars.
But he's still waiting for justice, for abuse he suffered at the hands of a priest, at an institution in Newfoundland.
Now living in Nova Scotia, Colson has spent years hoping for a settlement in his case.
But some legal experts say he may be the product of a chill following the high profile - and prolific - settlements in cases involving the Shelburne Youth Centre.
The CBC's Joan Weeks brings us Richard Colson's story.


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The Road to the Long Dragon

Posted by Christina Harnett

Chinese immigrants helped build Canada...and the Canadian economy.

But now changes to federal immigration regulations mean a traditional route to Canadian citizenship has been cut off....something that's also affecting the kitchens of local restaurants.

This week on Maritime Magazine, Lisa Roberts brings us the story

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Greg's Story

Posted by Christina Harnett

At 23, Greg McManus was a new police officer, with a girlfriend, a motorcycle and a job in Amherst, Nova Scotia.

But a serious accident would change his life forever.

Greg spent most of the next two decades fighting to get out of a PEI mental institition.

And fighting for control over his own money.

The CBC's Pat Martel has followed Greg's story for years....on Maritime Magazine he brings us the conclusion.

Listen Here

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Brian Stewart and the Atlantic School of Theology

Posted by Christina Harnett

Brian Stewart is a well-known, and long-time correspondant for CBC News.

He was the first to bring us the story of famine in Ethiopia in the nineteen eighties, something that changed broadcasting and humanitanian work forever.

Brian also covered the Falklands War among other conflicts, he told us stories from the former Soviet Union, the Middle East - and Margaret Thatcher's England.

During all that he felt his job was always to show how human beings not only fall prey to evil, but how they rise above it.

Brian was in Halifax to speak at the fortieth anniversary gala for the Atlantic School of Theology.

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The Atlantic School of Theology was actually born during a time of dramatic change in the way people worship.

That was four decades ago, and the school, which is unique in the world, is celebrating its anniversary this week.

Margaret Sager is the chair of the board of govenors at AST.

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Sir Ken Robinson

Posted by Christina Harnett

His talks on YouTube have been viewed by millions of people in more than 150 countries.

He's considered one of the world's most influential thinkers on innovation and creativity...and he's even been knighted.

Sir Ken Robinson believes the public school system, with its reliance on standardized testing and narrow curricula, is stripping children of their natural creativity.

He was in Halifax recently and he sat down for a chat with Pauline.

Listen Here

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House Concerts

Posted by Christina Harnett

With music available a million different ways, on dozens of devices, the House Concert is a throwback to an older - very old - model of entertainment.

Music lovers throw open their doors to friends and strangers...all paying customers....and the artist performs in their living room.

It's an idea that's taken hold in the Maritimes and across Canada, and Shelley Thompson brings us a behind the scenes look at the pros and cons of house concerts.

Listen Here

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Knitting, bagged lunches and no Facebook...

Posted by Christina Harnett

Teachers at Moncton High were noticing a disturbing trend among their students.
They seemed tired, anxious and disconnected with their community.
So the teachers decided to do something about it, to try and get their students back.
The CBC's Vanessa Blanch put together our documentary.


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Dr F Clarke Fraser and the Medical Hall of Fame

Posted by Christina Harnett

When Dr F Clarke Fraser began his medical career, genetics were something you only studied in fruit flies and mice.

The young scientist from Nova Scotia was the first in Canada to bring human medicine and genetics together.

He was also the first to begin counselling families about genetic risks for birth defects.

Now retired at 91, Dr Fraser was recently inducted into the Canadian Medical Hall of Fame, along with Terry Fox and several other medical luminaries.

Pauline went to visit Dr Fraser at his home in Bear River, near Digby.

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From Russia...via Israel...to Saint John.

Posted by Christina Harnett

Jewish communities across the region have been shrinking over the last few decades.

It's especially true in Saint John, a city with a long, proud history of Jewish life.

Now the community is looking to an unlikely source for new members...Israel itself.

Freelancer Lorne Daltrop has the story.


(All the music in this story is courtesy of Roman Kekhman.)


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Kandace Hagen and the PEI Abortion Debate

Posted by Christina Harnett

It's the not the kind of story that usually makes headlines.

A group of young people in Atlantic Canada in friendly competition for a leadership award.

But one of those young people was Kandace Hagen, a staunch pro-choice activist who pledged to use her award to help more Prince Edward Island women get access to abortions.

PEI is the only Canadian province that does not perform abortions...women have to go off-Island to either Halifax or Frederiction.

A member of the Island's Right to Life association urged people to vote against Hagen, and instead vote for her nearest competitor, who is from New Brunswick.

Here is Ann Marie Thomlins...

Here is an interview with Ann Marie Thomlins.

Listen to this week's show...

Kandace Hagen and Dr Colleen McQuarrie

Work Bullies

Posted by Christina Harnett

It's probably won't surprise you to hear there are bullies in the work-place.

What IS surprising are the types of people workplace bullies typically target.

And it may actually shock you to hear how prevalent, costly and dangerous the problem can be.

The CBC's Jerry West speaks to people who have been bullied, people who admit to being a bully, and people who study the phenomenon, and it's effects.

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"We Owe It To Ourselves" (Life and Sex after Cancer)

Posted by Christina Harnett

People who've recovered from cancer know many things are lost to the disease which can never be returned.

This week on Maritime Magazine, meet some people who say sex ISN'T one of them.

The CBC's Julia Cook introduces us to two people, both of them cancer survivors, who talk openly about the road back to intimacy.

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The Chicken War

Posted by Christina Harnett

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St. Francois New Brunswick used to be a happy community.

Now friends and neighbours, even family members, have stopped speaking to each other.

The CBC's Jacques Poitras tells us how a dispute over chickens is threatening to tear a town apart.

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Mind the Gap - Teachers Edition

Posted by Christina Harnett

In our on-going series about education, two veteran teachers talk about the challenges they face, and what they think would make the system better.

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Finding His Voice

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This week on Maritime Magazine a profile of Clyde Wray, a published poet, theatre director and the voice of a popular nighttime radio show in Saint John.

His story goes from an artistic household in New York, to Vietnam, to being homeless on the streets of America.

In the end it was art that saved him....and it's his incredible voice that leaves such an impression on the people in his adopted community.

Listen here

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Phoenix Rising Part Two

Posted by Christina Harnett

Pauline brings us part two of her documentary... Phoenix Rising.

We re-join a Halifax choir - which includes kids who've lived on the streets - as they get ready for a crucial performance.

It's their first home-town show!

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Phoenix Rising

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week on Maritime Magazine, host Pauline Dakin brings us a story about the power of music to transform lives.

The Phoenix Community choir is made up of kids who've spent time on the streets, along with volunteers and people who work with them.

This past fall, the choir hooked up with another group at Bishop's University in Quebec to play a series of extraordinary shows.

Here is part one of our documentary (part two will air in the New Year)

Listen here

The Colored Home

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Opened in 1921, for many years the Nova Scotia Home for Colored Children was the only orphanage in the province that would accept black children.

In fact children from across the region were sent there.

While the Home is a symbol of refuge and community spirit for many people, it's also the target of controversy.

Several dozen people have come forward to say they were abused and neglected by former staff and residents.

The claims have been slowly making their way through the court system for almost a decade.

Our story this week comes from freelance reporter, Bethany Horne.

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Ground Support

Posted by Christina Harnett

Soon the veterans of Canada's Armed Forces will once again gather at public squares and cenotaphs to mark Remembrance Day.

But not all of them will go home when the ceremonies are over.

Many of them don't have a home.

The CBC's Shaina Luck brings us a documentary about how some former veterans are trying to help their brothers-in-arms.

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Jim Lowther, president of V.E.T.S. Canada. Photo: CBC News


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Jim Lowther speaking with a homeless veteran. Photo: CBC News

The Supers

Posted by Christina Harnett

This season on Maritime Magazine, we are focusing on issues in education and the public school system.

Recently we had a chance to speak with three school board superintendents, to ask them to respond to parent concerns.

We would also like to hear your questions or comments on what they had to say, and what you think about the state of public education in the Maritimes.

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Love for Gambia

Posted by Christina Harnett

In this episode we run along with Erin Poirer as she crosses the country of Gambia in West Africa.

Born on PEI, Erin usually works as a nurse at a high school in Halifax.

But this past summer she combined her love of running with her passion for Africa...she ran more than 400 kilometres and raised more than $34,000 for a charity that does development work in the Gambia.

She took a tape recorder along to record her impressions, and the stories of the people she met.

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Erin's website

Two Planks, Twenty Years and Three Acts

Posted by Christina Harnett

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This year marks the twentieth anniversary of Nova Scotia's Two Planks and a Passion Theatre.

For most of that time, audiences and theatre professionals have been making the trek to a gorgeous, but remote spot on the North Mountain, in King's County.

That's where Two Planks' founders - and married couple - Chris O'Neil and Ken Schwartz have their Ross Creek Centre for the Arts.

The CBC's Carmen Klassen visited them there.

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Blessing and A Curse

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week we have an unforgettable story about a family from Prince Edward Island who travelled to the South Pacific to help lift a one-hundred and fifty year old curse!

The story comes to us from the CBC's Julia Cook.

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Election 2011 on Prince Edward Island

Posted by Christina Harnett

PNP dumptruck.jpgA ho-hum election on PEI got a lot more interesting - and even a little nasty - when the federal government brought the Island's immigration scandal back to the front burner.

This week we looked at how that story played out in town halls and on Twitter.

And we find out what else Islanders across the province are saying in the lead-up to Monday's election.

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The Edmonton Model (Interview with Angus McBeath)

Posted by Christina Harnett

As the gap between rich and poor widens, many say we need a revolution in education to help more kids succeed in school.

Thirty years ago, that revolution happened in Edmonton - and it was led by a Maritimer.

Angus McBeath was born in New Brunswick, educated in Nova Scotia and started teaching on Prince Edward Island.

But it was as the superintendent of Edmonton Public Schools that he really made his mark.

He speaks to Pauline about the lessons schools here can take away from the Edmonton model.

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Mind The Gap

Posted by Christina Harnett

It's September. A month of new backpacks and unscuffed shoes and fresh looseleaf. A time alive with acadmic possibility.
But for some children, all that promise just doesn't pan out.
Provincial governments across the country have long tried to figure out why some students barely scrape by, fail classes or drop out of school, while others flourish.
What they've found is that the gap between ambition and achievement isn't so easy to close.
Reporter Lezlie finds out why, in her documentary "Mind the Gap."

LIsten

Border Stories

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Ten years ago the United States closed it's borders after the terrorist attacks of 9/11.

When they opened again things had changed dramatically for people who live along Canada's oldest boundary.

The CBC's Jacques Poitras visits the line between New Brunswick and Maine, to find out how the last decade has affected communities whose ties go back centuries.

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Elizabeth Bishop Documentary (summer edition)

Posted by Christina Harnett

Elizabeth Bishop is considered one of the most distinguished American poets of the twentieth century.

What's not so well known is her deep connection to the Maritimes. And the deep connection many people here feel to her.

In her documentary, "Should We Have Stayed At Home, Whereever That May Be.." Carmen Klassen tells us how local Bishop fans and scholars are celebrating her centenary.


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The Search for Boundary Rock

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week Philip Moscovitch takes us on a quest to find a piece of Maritime folklore that hasn't been seen in a century.

Earlier this spring Philip went along on a canoe trip, deep into Nova Scotia's Tobeatic Wilderness Area.

The group was searching for a huge piece of granite that marks the boundaries of four counties. It used to be a common sight, but now no one is entirely sure where it is.

And the group, led by Fredericton's Paul Maybee, hoped to be the first to find the Boundary Rock in at least a generation.


Listen to Boundary Rock

Boundary Rock Photos on Flickr

Micro-Research

Posted by Christina Harnett

Micro-finance is the notion of providing small loans to people in developing countries to set themselves up in businesss.

"Micro-research", based on a similar idea, is a new concept developed by two pediatric specialists at the region's largest children's hospital.

Pauline met with Dr Noni MacDonald and Dr Bob Bortolussi to find out more.

Micro-research

Year of the Rat

Posted by Christina Harnett

Where there are humans...there are rats.

In the Maritimes alone, experts put the rat census at about 50 to 60 thousand, or enough to fill the region's biggest arena six times over!

So even though most of us wish they wouldn't, it's easy to see why rats often show up in our...personal space.

Freelancer Lezlie Lowe goes where few dare to tread in her documentary, Year of the Rat.

Year of the Rat

At Home - Chez Soi

Posted by Christina Harnett

In Moncton, an ex-federal cabinet minister, a young researcher and an unemployed truck driver are at the centre of an initiative that might just make a difference in the lives of people with mental illness, and no place to live.

The CBC's Vanessa Blanch tells us about the "At Home-Chez Soi" program.

(Please note: this version of the documentary has been altered due to rights issues.)

At Home-Chez Soi

Sound and Fury -The Race to Bring Big-Name Acts to the Maritimes

Posted by Christina Harnett

It's hard not to love a massive outdoor summer concert, but in the past five years, government pursuit of these events has left a costly legacy for some taxpayers.

While Moncton seems to have found a winning-formula for big outdoor shows, in Summerside, PEI, city officials claim they were conned into giving more than a million dollars to a California company, for a rock concert that never happened.

And in Halifax, an auditor is expected to report this week on how the mayor and his staff secretly bet millions of taxpayer dollars on money-losing events.

Freelancer Richard Foot explores how cities in our region got caught up in the costly race for the world's biggest entertainers.

Sound and Fury

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A Man Most Ordinary (the story of Clifton Stewart)

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week we were saddened to learn that Clifton Stewart passed away at his home in Charlotttetown. He was 91.

Many of you may remember our documentary about Mr Stewart, and his activities during the Second World War.

Mr Stewart was recruited by the British Military for his radio operating skills.

He was one of several hundred allied troops trained at a special covert facility in southern Ontario called Camp X.

It wasn't something he spoke about for many years, but in 2008 he told his story to the CBC's Laura Chapin.

A Man Most Ordinary

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Anatomy of a "Break-Through." Dr. Jock Murray Interview

Posted by Christina Harnett

It was the biggest health story to hit the airwaves in years...news that an Italian doctor had pioneered what appeared to be a break-through for people with Multiple Sclerosis.

Canadian patients flocked to overseas clinics for the treatment, and pressured their governments to pay for it here. Meanwhile neurologists shook their heads - and asked for more research.

Now, even some of the treatment's initial supporters are backing away.

This week on Maritime Magazine, Dr Jock Murray, one of the country's leading experts on MS, looks at the frenzy surrounding Paolo Zamboni's controversial findings.

Dr Jock Murray

Waiting for the Mid-Wife

Posted by Christina Harnett

Midwifery is hardly a new practice, but it has never been a part of the public health care system in this region.

Recently all three Maritime provinces have been looking at ways to bring mid-wifery into the mainstream.

The government of Nova Scotia has come closest, enacting legislation to regulate the practice of midwives and bring them under the auspices of district health authorities.

Yet many women in the province say it's a failed experiment, that it's more difficult than ever to deliver their babies with the help of a mid-wife.

Norma Jean Macphee brings us the story.

Mid-Wives

Language of the Mind

Posted by Christina Harnett

Every year thousands of people arrive in Canada unable to read or write in English.

What many of us don't realize is that a significant number of those immigrants never learned to read or write in their OWN language either.

But a unique program in Halifax is taking a whole new approach towards learning english as second language. And it's garnering attention across the country.

The CBC's Margot Brunelle introduces us to some of the people enrolled in the Halifax program.

Language of the Mind

Day With Daryl

Posted by Christina Harnett

For Daryl Shand, the noise and bustle of city life was too much, so he moved out of Halifax and into rural Kennetcook, Nova Scotia.

The problem is, Daryl has a mental illness, he can't work, and his therapist is in the city...an hour's drive away.

Freelancer Angele Cano finds out how Daryl is trying to raise money to solve his transportation problems.

And how geography - and poverty - can be huge barriers to people receiving help for mental illness.

Daryl's Day

University of King's College Student Work

Posted by Christina Harnett

Maritime Magazine features work from story-tellers of the future, short documentaries from student journalists, about to graduate from the University of King's College in Halifax.

Student Documentaries

Islanders By Choice

Posted by Christina Harnett

In some Maritime communities there are still two kinds of people...those who are "from" here and those who "come from away."

Take Prince Edward Island for example...Islanders are among the most welcoming and friendly of folk.

But many newcomers - or CFAs - say that friendliness only goes so far. Even after having spent years on PEI, they feel isolated and unable to break into community life.

Freelancer Dave Atkinson explores the idea of being "Islanders by Choice."

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Federal Election Panel

Posted by Christina Harnett

Last week federal ministers and Conversative MPs fanned out across the country for photo-ops and funding announcements.

At the same time, the opposition released new ads, and talked openly about voting against the government on two important confidence votes.

It looks like an election is coming.

And if it does, a handful of seats in Atlantic Canada could be the game-changer.

This week we talk to three political watchers about the seats in play, the issues important to the region, and what Maritimers want to hear on the hustings.

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Proof of L.O.V.E.

Posted by Christina Harnett

While high profile cases of youth violence make headlines, a group in Halifax has quietly spent the last decade giving young people a place to be heard.

The group is called L.O.V.E. which stands for Leave Out Youth Violence.

It is considered a rare success at helping young people turn their lives around.

Reporter Maggie Rahr spent months getting to know the kids and the leaders at L.O.V.E, to try to find out why it's had such on impact.

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The L.O.V.E website

The St Croix Alewives

Posted by Christina Harnett

This week on Maritime Magazine, the story of how a group of fishing guides in Maine convinced the state government to keep a native fish species out of their lucrative waters.

And the effect this has had on what many consider to be an important food source for Atlantic groundfish stocks.

The CBC's Connell Smith brings us the story of the "alewife"...also known as gaspereau in many parts of the Maritimes.

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Fourteen Angels

Posted by Christina Harnett

For four decades the New Brunswick Youth Orchestra has been a training ground - and a stage - for some of the region's most talented young musicians.

But organizers recently hit a sour note with some parents and alumni.

The CBC's Jacques Poitras looks at the controversy surrounding the New Brunswick Youth Orchestra.


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The Art of Dying

Posted by Christina Harnett

When it comes to the end of life, the word 'caregiver' can mean different things.

Sometimes, it's a professional who visits regularly, and helps people stay in their homes as long as possible.

But often "caregiver" is the family member or friend who puts their own life aside to help a loved one through the final passage.

Freelance reporter Janna Graham introduces us to two familes coping with "The Art of Dying."

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Supernova Hunters - Part 2

Posted by Christina Harnett

Earlier this month, a ten year old girl from Fredericton made international headlines as the youngest person to ever discover a supernova - or exploding star.

Kathyrn Aurora Gray handled herself well with the international press...which isn't that surprising.

In 1995 her father, Paul Gray, was the youngest person to discover a supernova...though he was the ripe old age of 22!

Dave Atkinson tells us about 15 years of astronomy breakthroughs, as seen through one family.

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Christmas Community Dinner

Posted by Christina Harnett

For many of us, this is the time to leave crowds and noise behind, and hunker down for a quiet holiday with family and close friends.

But in some communities, Christmas Day just wouldn't be the same without the whole town coming together.

On Maritime Magazine this week, freelance broadcaster Philip Moscovitch brings us the story behind Bridgewater, Nova Scotia's Second Annual Community Christmas dinner.

And how organizers discovered the "needy" are not just those who may be short of money.

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Wiping Away the Witches Brew (an update on the Sydney Tar Ponds)

Posted by Christina Harnett

For years it was seen as Canada's most notorious toxic waste site.

The Tar Ponds in the middle of Sydney, Cape Breton collected run-off from the nearly coke ovens and steel plant for nearly a century, a witches brew of chemicals and pollutants that eventually started bubbling out of the ground near people's homes.

It took almost two decades to agree on a way to clean it up...and now that clean-up is almost complette.

The CBC's Wendy Martin gives us an update.

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Parent Abuse

Posted by Christina Harnett

According to research conducted in the Maritimes, 10 to 14 per cent of parents experience some form of abuse at the hands of their children.

Usually the parent in question is the mother, and she's usually raising the children alone.

Recently the CBC's Margot Brunelle met several women taking part in a program called Standing Our Ground, run through the Halifax YWCA.

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Castle Frederick Farm

Posted by Christina Harnett

On the west bank of the Avon river, in Nova Scotia's Hants County, the eighth generation of the Bremner family continues to farm a piece of land that has been in the family since 1763.

Earlier this month the province's Archeological Land Trust signed an agreement with the family to protect part of their land as a site of archeological interest.

But the four Bremner sisters - who along with their father,now own the farm - are thinking about the future as much as the past.

Host Pauline Dakin visits the farm and the family to hear their story.
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Edmonton Protocol

Posted by Christina Harnett

There are two-hundred thousand people in Canada with type 1 diabetes.
The cells in their bodies don't produce the insulin required to help turn sugar into energy. Most type 1 diabetics have to really watch what they eat, test themselves constantly, and most importantly, they have to take regular doses of insulin.
But what if they didn't?
We report on the latest research.

Journey to Tompkinsville

Posted by Christina Harnett

Growing up in Reserve Mines, Cape Breton, Lindsay Kyte says she had a vague understanding of the "Antigonish Movement."

But she certainly never knew about her own family's connection to it..until a few years ago.

Now, the actor and playwright is bringing her family history and her art together, to help a new generation of Canadians learn about the famous social justice pioneers

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Please note that due to music rights restrctions there is no podcast version of the show this week.

Mystery of the Malpeque Bell/Binstead Haunting

Posted by Christina Harnett

In honour of Halloween we bring you two tales from that most ominous of Maritime locations...PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND!!

One is a "real"ghost story, guarateed to raise the hairs on your neck.

The other is about a missing piece of parish history on the North Shore of PEI.

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Standing on Guard Pt 2

Posted by Christina Harnett

Veterans from this region and across the country have been speaking out about the treatment they say they're receiving at the hands of Veterans Affairs Canada.

Long delays, overwhelming paperwork, and breaches of personal security are just some of the complaints ex-military personel have been leveling at the agency.

Even the military ombudsman, Pat Stogran, has spoken out, saying it appears as though Veterans Affairs will go to great lengths NOT to help people receive their benefits.

Last week on Maritime Magazine, Bob Murphy profiled one ex-soldier with post-traumatic stress disorder. Danny McIntyre was one of the first Canadian soldiers to go to Afghanistan. He now calls Veterans Affairs the "nemesis" of his life.

On this show Bob speaks with a spokeswoman from Veterans Affairs about those complaints.

And we hear the story of Second World War vet and his wife who had tp spend their final years apart.

Listen here

Standing on Guard

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Recently Canada's military ombudsman spoke out about the poor treatment he says ex-military personel are receiving at the hands of Veterans Affairs Canada.

Pat Stogran's term has not been renewed by the federal government, but last month defence minister Peter MacKay announced an additional 2 billion dollars for veterans and their families.

The problem is, many say it's the system itself that's broken, a bureacracy that forces people to keep fighting after they come back from the war zones.

The CBC's Bob Murphy prepared this look at one soldier's life.

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Occasionally Mrs Plunkett

Posted by Christina Harnett

Suzanne and Anne Plunkett

Suzanne and Anne Plunkett

Suzanne and Neiff Joseph

Suzanne and Neiff Joseph

This week Maritime Magazine celebrates the writings of a woman who was a born storyteller...but whose tales never really made it outside her own family and friends.

Suzanne Plunkett Joseph was from Bridgwater, Nova Scotia. She died recently after a long battle with cancer.

One of her greatest gifts was to see the humour in every situation, a gift for which her family and community were grateful.

In honour of her - and Thanksgiving - Gordon Pinsent reads from her work, titled, "Occasionally Mrs Plunkett."

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Pursuing a Pedophile

Posted by Christina Harnett


This week convicted pedophile Ernest Fenwick MacIntosh was sentenced to four years in prison for crimes he committed in the 1970s.

It's the latest in a case that has dragged on for decades, as his victims sought to have MacIntosh charged, and then extradited back to Canada from India.

On Maritime Magazine reporter Joan Weeks talks to the man who first laid charges against MacIntosh.

And tries to get to the bottom of WHY it took so long for justice to be done in this case.

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The Cooke Family

Posted by Christina Harnett

Woody Woods is our guide as we meet an African-Nova Scotia family celebrating its 225th anniversary!

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John (Appleseed) Stuart

Posted by Christina Harnett

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Three decades ago, the town of Wolfville, Nova Scotia was facing the same fate as many Maritime communities.

Thousands of its gorgeous trees had been devastated by Dutch Elm disease. The town could re-plant SOME, but not all of them.

That's when John Stuart stepped in...over the years he's planted thousands of trees...both in Wolfville and across the region. For free. People call him a modern Johnny Appleseed. But it's a calling whose seed was planted generations ago.

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The CBC's Melissa Friedman brings us a profile of John on this week's Maritime Magazine..

The Other Side of the Fist

Posted by Christina Harnett

Freelancer Lezlie Lowe has covered stories about violence against women, but she'd never talked to the other side; she'd never spoken to a man who abused.

Until she met Jason.

Listen to the Documentary here

Here is a link for information about the New Start program.

Maritime Magazine in the Summer

Posted by Christina Harnett

Join us on the radio - or scroll through the archives here - for some of our favorite shows from this past season.

And then please come on back in September for brand new documentaries from reporters across the Maritimes.

Have a great summer!

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The Treasure Trove Debate

Posted by Christina Harnett

If you find treasure on land, the rules are pretty clear; hand it all over to the provincial government.

But, if you find treasure under the ocean - at least in Nova Scotian waters - it's a whole other can of worms.

Nova Scotia is the only province with a Treasure Trove Act, orginally written to deal with prospectors hoping to find treasure on Oak Island.

As reporter Stephen Puddicombe tells us, the provincial government is considering whether to change the Act....so he spoke with people for and against the legislation.

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Making the Most of the "I Dos" - how Maritimers could do more to cash in on weddings

Posted by Christina Harnett

Forget romance and "til death do us part", we all know that weddings are big business.

Very big business.

So why aren't more vendors in the region cashing in on the latest must-haves for trendy couples?

This week one local bride-to-be shows us the gaps in the matrimonial marketplace in the Maritimes.

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The Big Split in Nackawic - Privacy, Power and Politics in a small town.

Posted by Christina Harnett

If someone started going through your mailbox at home, or peeking through your window as you composed a letter...chances are you'd consider that an invasion of privacy.

But what if someone started reading your personal e-mails?
What if they did it at work?
And what if that person was your boss?

That's what happened to a former employee at the town council office in Nackawic, New Brunswick.
And,the dispute over whether she has a right to be upset over it - has divided the town.

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Maybe God Sent Bernie (the story of the first Halifax Group of Five)

Posted by Christina Harnett

Our story this week is about a generous man, originally from Prince Edward Island, who devoted his life to helping recent immigrants to Canada.

He helped make possible the reunion of two brothers, using a method of immigrant sponsership called A Group of Five. It's not used much in this region, in fact these individuals came to call themselves "the First Halifax Group of Five."

But the story took years to unfold... and not everyone got to see the happy ending. The CBC's Lisa Roberts brings us her documentary titled, "Maybe God Sent Bernie."

Habtom's Path

Posted by Christina Harnett

Earlier this year news came out that the body of a 40 year old man, originally from Eritrea, had been found in the woods near Halifax.

Habtom Kibraeb arrived in Nova Scotia as a refugee claimant, after a long and dangerous journey from his homeland.

When he found out Immigration Canada had rejected his claim, and decided to deport him...he committed suicide

A week after his body was found, the CBC's Mary Lynk sat down with friends and advisors to go beyond the headlines, and learn more about Habtom's death.

And his life.

Her documentary is called Habtom's Path.

Listen here

Sister Donna Brady

Posted by Christina Harnett

The Sisters of St Martha in Antigonish have always been about hospitality and sanctuary.

"The Marthas" as they're known, began more than a century ago, at what was then, St Francis Xavier College.
T
hey acted as the housekeepers and caretakers for the students and priests who went there...eventually expanding their mission beyond the walls of the University.

Now Sister Donna Brady and some of her colleagues at the Marthas are taking on a new mission.

They're giving rank and file Catholics in the area a chance to come together, ask questions, and even challenge the way the Church is handling the current crisis.

Maritime Magazine host Pauline Dakin sat down last week with Sister Donna Brady, who helps run the Bethany Retreat Centre in Antigonish.

Listen here

Contact the Marthas Here

Award-winning stories!!

Posted by Christina Harnett

Myfanwy Davies' documentary about the wonderful life - and tragic death - of St Thomas University professor John McKendy recently won two prestigious awards.

On May 1, 2010 it was awarded the Dave Rogers Award for Long Feature at the Radio Television News Directors Awards in Saint John.

And on May 8th it won the Atlantic Journalism Gold Award for Feature Writing-Radio.

Here is the story, which first aired in March 2009.

On May the 8th, at the Atlantic Journalism Awards, Bob Murphy and Margot Brunelle received the Gold Award for Enterprise Reporting-Radio for their story about the disappearance of Kimberley McAndrew twenty years ago.

That story first aired on Maritime Magazine last fall. You can hear it again here.

Our congratulations to Myfanwy, Bob and Margot, and thanks for their fine work.


Building a Family (our Mother's Day Show)

Posted by Christina Harnett

For Jesse Lee Lomax and Dan Robichaud, there was never any question they would have a large family.

And there was never a question the children would be adopted...Jesse Lee decided on that when she was still a teenager.

But the road to international adoption is far from smooth. And it can be particularly rough if you're trying to integrate the only black children for miles around into a small, white, French community.

This week Maritime Magazine brings us the story of a young couple from Bouctouche New Brunswick, and the hurdles they've faced trying to bring their family together.


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Rescue Archeology

Posted by Christina Harnett

Rising sea levels and the eroding coastline in the Maritimes are causing havoc with some of the region's most important hisoric sites.

At Fortress Louisburg in Cape Breton, for example, every new storm surge reveals a time capsule.

This week on Maritime Magazine, reporter Stephen Puddicombe tells us about something called "rescue archeology,"...the measures scientists are taking to ensure our coastal history isn't entirely washed out to sea.

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After Cancer

Posted by Christina Harnett

IMG_0636.JPGAt 26 years old, Shawn Campbell worked hard, partied hard and did pretty much what he wanted, when he wanted.

Then he got cancer, and everything changed.

Now, 12 years later, Shawn has been through his treatment and recovery.

But he, like thousands of other young cancer survivors, felt abandoned when he finally walked out of the hospital for the last time.

This week Maritime Magazine looks at the issue of after-care for young people with cancer.

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Click here for more information about Dr Miedema's study about young cancer patients.

Against The Dying of the Light

Posted by Christina Harnett

Fred Ross longs for the light.

He needs it in order to make art.

But the acclaimed New Brunswick artist finds good light hard to come by these days, "trapped" as he is, in a nursing home.

Our documentary about Mr Ross, and his predicament, was produced by the CBC's Mary Lynk and freelance broadcaster, Judith Mackin.

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Brindi Come Home

Posted by Christina Harnett

She is the most famous dog in Nova Scotia and she's been on death row for almost two years.

Brindi is a six-year old shepherd mix from East Chezzetcook, who was seized by animal control in 2008.

Her owner has been fighting to get her back ever since. This week the CBC's Eileen McInnis goes behind the Brindi headlines.

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Easter Show

Posted by Christina Harnett

In honour of Easter we have two stories about finding spiritual fulfillment through the creation of something new.

In one case it's a work of art; in another it's new homes for people who've been waiting for them a long time.

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Two Country Doctors

Posted by Christina Harnett

In some ways it seems as though Bud Ings and Pius Murnaghan were always meant to be friends.

Dr Ings is a well-known author, politician and legendary animal doctor from Prince Edward Island.

Dr Murhaghan is the efficient, respected young veterinarian who took over his practice.

But the similarities between the two men don't end there...and their friendship goes beyond mentor and protege.

Maritime Magazine, in collaboration with Land And Sea, presents a portrait of these two country doctors.

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