September 2012 Archives

Erin Costelo - Charlie A'Court - On Atlantic Airwaves, Saturday September 29, 2012

Posted by Glenn Meisner

On this saturday's edition of 'Atlantic Airwaves' - two features on two new albums - Erin Costelo will be along with her new recording 'We Can Get Over' - and Charlie A'Court will be by with his new release 'Triumph & Disaster'
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It's been three years since Erin Costelo delivered her Fire & Fuss collection, but the Halifax-based singer-songwriter returns later this fall with a new soul-geared album called 'We Can Get Over'. The 10-song set, which a press release explains is inspired by Costelo's love of "old soul, '60s vocal groups and classic arranging," will be released on October 9. "The album is inspired by records that I love and wanting to make an album, or aspire to make an album, that would move people as much as great records have moved me," says Costelo. The album's arrangements strive to stand shoulder to shoulder with the likes of Jerry Ragavoy, Bert Burns and Burt Bacharach, with its overall sound said to be similar to the Dells, the Impressions and the Exciters. Costelo produced the album herself, a first for the musician, and tracked the bulk of it at Halifax's Echo Chamber Studio with engineer Charles Austin. Additional recording was done at Phil Sedore's Living Room Studio. On top of Costelo's smoky singing voice, the record features Clive MacNutt on guitar and bass, Lukas Pearse on bass, some drumming from Benn Ross and Dave Marsh, and some assistance from Anne Simons of the Blue Engine String Quartet and the NSCC Choir. Background vocals are also offered up from Selah Koile, Samm Reid, and Kirsten Donawa.
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Charlie A'Court's first studio recording in six years, 'Triumph & Disaster' was recorded at Codapop Studios in Halifax with producer Chris Kirby of St. John's, NL at the helm. The album features 13 brand new original songs from Charlie A'Court and an impressive lineup of co-writers including Ron Hynes, Kim Wempe, Jamie Robinson, Chris Kirby, Dave Simpson and Jason Mingo, along with a cover of Sam Cooke's classic "A Change Is Gonna Come". The album title, 'Triumph & Disaster', is a tip of the hat to the late, British author, Rudyard Kipling and his acclaimed poem, 'IF' " says A'Court. "The excerpt reads, If you can meet with Triumph & Disaster and treat those two impostors just the same...the line refers to a balance between high and low emotions." A'Court plays with a delicate balance of emotion touching on feelings of jubilation, redemption, isolation and absolute love for another. Winner of the 2007 East Coast Music Award for Pop Recording of the Year and 2007 Music Nova Scotia Blues Recording of the Year for his album Bring On The Storm and 2003 Best Blues Artist for his debut album Color Me Gone, A'Court has walked the line between blues and adult contemporary.

Jennah Barry - Dance Movie - On Atlantic Airwaves, Saturday September 22, 2012

Posted by Glenn Meisner

On this Saturday's edition of 'Atlantic Airwaves' we'll have two features on two new recordings. Jennah Barry's 'Young Men', and Dance Movie's 'Interlopers'
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It takes you by surprise; within the first minute of her debut album Young Men, Jennah Barry's mellifluous voice swoops in unassumingly and sweeps you into awave of warm, swirling tones--a stark contrast to the circumstances in which they were borne.
Originally from coastal Clearland, Nova Scotia, Jennah Barry did what many gifted small-town musicians do and made the move to Toronto in 2006. Though engaged in music, a pianist first, she studied jazz there, while also lending her voice to orchestral poppers The O'Darling, Barry grew sad and reclusive from acombination of homesickness and heartache. So she wrote. She wrote songs of vulnerability, dovetailed with wistfulness. But to sing these songs, she'd need to tap into boldness lost, so she quit the big city the day after her graduation and returned to the South Shore. It took a while but, in her natural element, the moxie came back.
'Young Men' wavers between dreamily bucolic and quietly haunting. With vocals that glide triumphantly over a period of bleak times, Jennah Barry's debut is at times lush, at times minimal, but always captivating.
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Using Regina Spektor's four-producer Far approach and the Yeah Yeah Yeahs' "Maps" as a thesis song, Dance Movie gathered three guides and a bunch more friends into spending a few mild winter days bowing guitars, squeezing accordions and singing doo-wop lines across 11 indie-pop songs. Inspired by the heartfelt-yet-sharp songwriting of Jenny Lewis, Brian Fallon, John K. Samson and Tori Amos, it begins quietly, at first blush, and just as quietly at failure, with the crush-to-rejection spectrum lying between. They called this recording 'Interlopers', for all the other people who don't end up where they thought they would. Produced in three parts by Matt Charlton (the experimenter), Amelia Curran (the folk diarist) and Jenn Grant (the pop maven), Interlopers is for sad sacks and hopeful dreamers, dancers and sleepers, lovers and haters--their rights, but mostly their wrongs.

Mo Kenney - The Stanfields - on Atlantic Airwaves, Saturday September 15, 2012

Posted by Glenn Meisner

On this Saturday's edition of Atlantic Airwaves we'll feature Mo Kenney's debut self-titled album as well as the new release from The Stanfields, 'Death & Taxes'
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The buzz around young Nova Scotia native Mo Kenney has been building over the last couple of years. Look for that to turn into a deafening (but tuneful) roar with the eagerly awaited September 25 release of her self-titled debut album. Mo Kenney comes out on the prestigious Toronto label Pheromone Recordings in partnership with Joel Plaskett's imprint, New Scotland Records. East Coast rock and roll hero Plaskett isn't just involved on the label side, he produced and played on the album, as well as contributing a couple of co-writes. The pair co-wrote two songs that are highlights of a record devoid of lowlights. Having influences and inspirations drawn from classic and alt-rock artists rather than the traditional singer/songwriter pantheon helps account for the bracing freshness of Mo Kenney's style. Fitting her sound into a neat box is an exercise in futility, though, if pressed, Mo can settle for "pop music with a folky twist. Mo Kenney has already garnered serious respect from her singer/songwriter peers. The list of those loudly singing her praises includes Ron Sexsmith, Brad Roberts (Crash Test Dummies), Gordie Sampson, and Steve Poltz. "To hear those comments from musicians you look up to is so nice," Mo says.
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Everyone has a story to tell about The Stanfields - if you don't, give it time. Inciting mosh pits and still making Mom proud, The Stanfields attract fans of all classes and creeds with their rhythm-fueled hard rock laced with traditional roots sounds. There are no glamorous motives - just five working class Canadians with an honest desire to entertain. With the help of iconic producer Mike Fraser (AC/DC, Metallica, Aerosmith) The Stanfields better capture the intensity of their riotous live show on Death & Taxes (coming September 18) with harder, faster and full-on thunderous waves of rhythm and roaring harmonies behind menacing leads. "We've grown to be louder, faster versions of ourselves. Many thousands of road and air miles, and all the trappings therein, tend to have that kind of effect on a band like ours," Jon explains. "Where Vanguard is all over the place stylistically, Death & Taxes is more focused on our rock and roll influences." And that's where The Stanfields' culture meets their simple desire to entertain - the stuff stories are made of.

Modern Grass - The Caravan - On Atlantic Airwaves Saturday September 8, 2012

Posted by Glenn Meisner

On this Saturday's edition of Atlantic Airwaves, two concerts from our East Coast Sessions -We'll hear from two Halifax based groups with totally different sounds, but who represent their respective genres in unique and refreshing ways - 'The Modern Grass Ensemble' and 'The Caravan'.
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The Modern Grass is a collective of musicians who all have some obsession with days gone by, contrasted with a vision for the future - The instrumentation is bluegrass, the music is newgrass - With influences ranging from jazz to bluegrass, gypsy to blues, classical and folk, this young group of musicians is melding styles and taking acoustic music into the future.
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At its core, 'The Caravan' is a refreshing East Coast hip hop trio whose roots run the gamut of rock, jazz, soul and even Appalachian music - Their preference for 'jamming it live' and for bring in other instrumentalists versus samples creates an energy and chemistry that is infections and catchy - The Caravan's music cleverly fuses rock all the different styles into a combination that is uniquely their own - The group's charm isn't just about its catchy and clever songs or decades of collected musical experience, but the strange comic interplay between members - In concert the band gives full rein to its eccentric personalities, and you can hear this unquantifiable chemistry in their recordings as well - Rowdy, fun and intelligent - They influence each other, always trying to improve their sound, while soaking in what Halifax is doing as a whole - They've never stopped exploring where they can take the music.