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Cabinet minister Pierre Poilievre explains why the Fair Elections Act is fair

Pierre Poilievre, Minister of State for Democratic Reform, (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand)

Pierre Poilievre, Minister of State for Democratic Reform, (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Fred Chartrand)

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The Minister of State for Democratic Reform, Pierre Poilievre, is standing by his Fair Elections Act in the face of criticism from past and present elections officials and concerned academics. 

Critics warn that eliminating vouching and voter ID cards could leave more than 100,000 Canadians unable to exercise their right to vote. The Minister points to a report that found thousands of irregularities where voters were vouched for in the 2011 election. He points to the 39 different forms of ID that Canadians will be able to use, reducing the possibility of fraud.

International critics have published open letters expressing concern that the Bill curbs the powers of the Chief Electoral Officer. Minister Poilievre argues that the Fair Election Act will allow Chief Electoral Officer to focus on the job of making sure our elections are run as they should be. 

Hear Minister Poilievre's defence of the Fair Elections Act.

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