Asian Heritage Month
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Toronto: CBC Film Screenings | Shadow of Gold Mountain | Sleeping Tigers: The Asahi Baseball Story | May 31

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Promotional still from Shadow of Gold Mountain, courtesy NFB
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Members of the 1941 Asahi Team before disbanding. (Ken Kutsukake, all rights reserved)

CBC Film Screenings

Saturday, May 31, 2008 | 1:00 - 5:00 p.m.
3C-304 at the CBC Building
25 John Street (Between Front Street and Wellington), Toronto

Significant stories on the history of Asian Canadian communities in Canada. Film screenings will include panel talks and special guests, including Charlotte Odele, Commissioning Editor for CBC Newsworld: The Lens and Lea Marin, Producer with the National Film Board

Shadow of Gold Mountain
(Karen Cho, 2004)

Sleeping Tigers: The Asahi Baseball Story
(Jari Osborne, 2003)


Seating will be extremely limited, so please RSVP early to North American Association of Asian Professionals (NAAAP) Toronto on the web or via e-mail.

In partnership with:
NAAAP Toronto | Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival | Toronto Sikh Professionals (TSP) | MyBindi.com

With thanks to the National Film Board.

Continue reading for film synopses.

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Sleeping Tigers: The Asahi Baseball Story - In pre-World War II Vancouver the Asahi baseball team was unbeatable, outplaying the taller Caucasian teams and winning the prestigious Pacific Northwest Championship for five straight years. When Japan bombed Pearl Harbor, the Canadian government sent every person of Japanese descent, whether born in Canada or not, to internment camps. Faced with hardship and isolation, the former Asahi members survived by playing baseball. Their passion for this quintessential North American game soon attracted other players, including RCMP and local townspeople, and the baseball games helped to break down racial and cultural barriers. In Sleeping Tigers, award-winning director Jari Osborne skillfully weaves archival film and dramatic re-creations, along with candid interviews with the last of the Asahi, to tell this remarkable story.

In the Shadow of Gold Mountain
- Karen Cho, a fifth-generation Canadian of mixed heritage, discovered that half her family wasn't welcome in the country they called home. While Canada encouraged and rewarded immigration from Europe, it imposed laws that singled out the Chinese as unwanted and unwelcome. Cho's film, In the Shadow of Gold Mountain, takes her from Montreal to Vancouver to uncover stories from the last living survivors of the Chinese Head Tax and Exclusion Act. This dark chapter in our history, from 1885 until 1947, plunged the Chinese community in Canada into decades of debt and family separation. At the centre of the film are personal accounts of extraordinary Chinese Canadians who survived an era that threatened to eradicate their entire community. Through a rich melding of history, poetry and raw emotion, this documentary sheds light on an era that shaped the identity of generations and with deeply moving testimonials, it reveals the profound ways this history still casts its shadow.

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