Video

Cut loose, footloose with these dancing kids from the Alberta School for the Deaf

"If you're deaf and you can't hear the music, you can definitely feel the vibrations. And that can really help you dance."

'If you're deaf and you can't hear the music, you can definitely feel the vibrations'

"If you're deaf and you can't hear the music, you can definitely feel the vibrations. And that can really help you dance." Student Pewhysis Thunder on her week with DanceED Movement Project 2:41

Alberta School for the Deaf vice principal Shelly Prain remembers that when she studied at the National Ballet School, people were surprised that she could dance. Being deaf, the assumption was that she couldn't hear the music — and therefore, she'd have a difficult time moving to it.

But Prain points out that dance is about movement, about knowing the rhythm. And she takes apart the stereotype, saying, "We have deaf doctors, deaf lawyers, deaf dancers — we can be anything...I think people need to take down that mindset."

Enter DanceED Movement Project, a program in Edmonton started by dancers Andrea Gregorio and Krista Deady. The Alberta School for the Deaf is among the many schools they take their empowering dance workshops to. Recently, Gregorio, Deady and a bunch of enthusiastic kids spent a week learning some dynamic routines in a gym equipped with a powerful subwoofer and danced it out, getting ready for a performance in front of their parents and the community at the end of the week.

(CBC Arts)

In this video, sit in on the group's rehearsals and learn about why this program means so much to Gregorio and Deady and the kids they work with.

Watch Exhibitionists on Friday nights at 12:30am (1am NT) and Sundays at 3:30pm (4pm NT) on CBC Television.

About the Author

Tamarra Canu

Tamarra Canu is an amateur filmmaker taking big steps in her career. She has recently worked on one of CBC’s The Nature of Things newest films named Vital Bonds and is now a member of another high profile documentary to air on CBC in 2019. Fun fact: she started her career at CBC News Edmonton as an Associate Producer, and is extremely proud to be staying close to home in her own craft.