Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Day 3

Saturday is the world premiere of Otto; or, Up with Dead People, and I’m surprisingly calm. I’ve already shown the film to my husband, Antonio, who, trust me, is my harshest critic, and to Katharina Klewinghaus, the female lead of the picture, and they both really like it, so that’s good enough for me. The rest is just gravy and stale popcorn.

In the afternoon Jeremy, my Otto, and I catch a movie called The Broken, a British horror movie about monstrous doppelgangers who break out of mirrors to murder and replace people. Think Invasion of the Body Snatchers meets Alice Through the Looking Glass. Despite its overabundance of horror clichés, it isn’t half bad. Then again, that must mean it isn’t half good.

After picking up my director’s jacket and having lunch, Jeremy and I try to find a liquor store, trudging through slushy parking lots and a maze of snow banks. When I finally choose my booze for the Otto after-party and try to check out, the mean man at the cash register looks at us askance and asks Jeremy for I.D. I tell him he isn’t 21, and the guy freaks out and tells us to get out of the store immediately because it’s illegal for minors to even be on the premises. He informs me that we’re on the surveillance cameras and that I shouldn’t try to come back alone to buy booze today. That’s Utah for you. For alcoholics, it’s like the seventh circle of hell.

After a brief rest and a cocktail at the chalet, we change and get ready for our pre-screening dinner at a restaurant called The Windy Ridge. I’ve been invited to participate in a gathering which includes Isaac Julien (here with his new documentary on Derek Jarman), Tom Kalin (with his feature Savage Grace, starring Julianne Moore), Greg Araki (here to celebrate the 15th-anniversary reissue of his movie The Living End) and, apparently as kind of an afterthought, me. Marcus Hu of my usual U.S. distribution company, Strand Releasing, coordinated the event, and since all the filmmakers have Strand in common, and as we were all lumped together under the moniker New Queer Cinema in the early nineties, it only makes sense that the four of us, still crazy and going strong after all these years, should celebrate together.

When we get to the restaurant, however, it seems my entourage has been set up with a long table in an adjacent room next to the kitchen. Oh well. As a former farm boy, I’m always more comfortable with the help anyway. I do mingle in the main dining room with the other three filmmakers, each of whom I’ve known for many years, and we pose for photos together. When I bring Greg Araki over to our dining table in the sticks to say hello to everybody, he remarks, “Wow, this looks like the kids’ table!” It’s actually quite a smart way of looking at it: the kiddy table is always the most fun. Jeremy, who is a big fan of Greg’s great movie Mysterious Skin, is thrilled to meet him. Tom Kalin also comes over and hangs out. He’s very gracious and sweet. We reminisce about the time we both gave a talk on queer cinema at the Pompidou Center in Paris. I can’t wait to see his hot new mother/son incest movie. It’s his first film in fifteen years, and it already made quite a splash at Cannes.

Two more of my co-producers – my L.A. gallerist Javier Peres and my fellow Canadian artist and international art world It Boy Terence Koh – finally make their grand entrance. Terence is wrapped in an obscenely expensive black and white chinchilla and fox coat. Heady with excitement, we fast forward through our meal and head for the Library for our world premiere.

In the green room I’m still not nervous and I handle an interview with the French TV station Arte with aplomb, if I do say so. The next thing we know we’re whisked onto the stage to present the movie. I calmly introduce everyone, including my director of photography, James Carman, who has just arrived from Brazil with some sort of awful virus he got on the plane. He can hardly stand up.

It’s pretty much a typical Sundance screening for me. About a half an hour into the film, there is a scene in which one zombie f---s another zombie in the rotten hole in his stomach. On cue, entire rows of people stand up in unison and walk out. People always walk out of my screenings here, but sometimes it’s difficult to distinguish between those suffering from brutally long days of film-watching (ours is a midnight screening) - festival burn-out, as it were - and those who are genuinely offended by the film or dislike it for other reasons. But for the majority who stay until the bitter end, there is a very enthusiastic response, judging by the lively Q and A. My best review so far, however, comes from a group of six straight teenage girls and boys who are waiting outside the theatre when I leave. Shari Frilot, the programmer who introduced the film, tells me she doesn’t even know how they managed to get into the screening, which is restricted. As I pass they all yelled “Great movie!” and “That was awesome” and “Thanks for making that movie!” You can’t ask for a better review than that.

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

This discussion is now Open. Submit your Comment.

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

Post a Comment

Disclaimer:

Note: By submitting your comments you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that due to the volume of e-mails we receive, not all comments will be published, and those that are published will not be edited. But all will be carefully read, considered and appreciated.

Note: Due to volume there will be a delay before your comment is processed. Your comment will go through even if you leave this page immediately afterwards.

Privacy Policy | Submissions Policy

Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

World »

Analysis ISIS poses bigger threat after nearly a year of coalition bombing video
A quick look at a map of Iraq, Syria and Jordan — to take in ISIS's most recent gains — and it's obvious that nearly a year after airstrikes against it began, the group poses a more immediate risk to more people and more important cities in the region than ever.
New Texas flooding sweeps away vacation home, 12 people missing
Recovery teams are set to resume looking for the 12 members of two families who authorities say are missing after a rain-swollen river in Central Texas carried a vacation home off its foundation, slamming it into a bridge downstream.
Galapagos Islands volcano erupts for first time in 33 years
Ecuador's Galapagos National Park administration said the 1.7 kilometre-high Wolf volcano began spewing fire, smoke and lava before dawn Monday.
more »

Canada »

Analysis The potential bond crisis most people have never heard of: Don Pittis
Many ordinary Canadians think they understand the risks of real estate. Stock market crashes are also on the popular radar. But the one of most dangerous bubbles may be growing in bonds, an asset class that seldom makes it as far as casual conversation. Don Pittis looks at why we should care.
Real estate woes: The secret lives of house poor Canadians
With rising housing prices and the lure of low interest rates, more Canadians are living house poor. We profile one family willing to talk about living "hand to mouth" as they struggle to keep their home and pay the bills.
Ontario Self-Employment Benefit shuts down in 2016 after funding cut
An Ontario-wide program that helps unemployed people and those recently eligible for employment insurance to start a small business is folding next spring.
more »

Politics »

Analysis ISIS poses bigger threat after nearly a year of coalition bombing video
A quick look at a map of Iraq, Syria and Jordan — to take in ISIS's most recent gains — and it's obvious that nearly a year after airstrikes against it began, the group poses a more immediate risk to more people and more important cities in the region than ever.
RCMP to release OPP report on Oct. 22 shooting, full Michael Zehaf-Bibeau video
RCMP Commissioner Bob Paulson says the OPP’s much-anticipated report into the RCMP’s response to the Parliament Hill shootings will be released either this week or next.
David Johnston's flight to pay respects to Saudi king cost $175K video
A January flight to send Gov. Gen. David Johnston to Saudi Arabia to offer Canada's condolences for the death of King Abdullah cost taxpayers $175,000, according to records obtained by CBC News. Logs released by the Defence Department under Access to Information show the Jan. 25-30 trip to Riyadh took more than 40 hours.
more »

Health »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Arts & Entertainment»

Suicide Squad shuts down Yonge Street, yet again video
One of the biggest movies ever filmed in Toronto will shut down a stretch of Yonge Street tonight as Suicide Squad films a high-speed chase.
Omar Sharif has Alzheimer's, according to agent
Legendary Lawrence of Arabia actor Omar Sharif is battling Alzheimer's disease, his agent Steve Kenis confirmed to The Associated Press on Monday.
On Towel Day, Hitchhicker's Guide to the Galaxy fans slam 'Geek Pride Day'
Is 'geek culture' even a thing anymore in 2015 outside of network TV shows and consumer trend reports? May 25th raises this and other questions as 'Geek Pride Day' overakes the more-meaningful 'Towel Day' on Twitter.
more »

Technology & Science »

Fake answers make online security questions less secure
Did you lie about your father's middle name to make it harder for cybercriminals to get into your email account? Chances are that you actually made your account less secure.
Non-human persons? Animal rights get legal leg up
Activists say chimpanzees are so similar to us they should be recognized under the law as "non-human persons," not unlike corporations. Most U.S. courts seem to disagree, but animal rights lawyers see a glimmer of hope in recent Canadian rulings.
Galapagos Islands volcano erupts for first time in 33 years
Ecuador's Galapagos National Park administration said the 1.7 kilometre-high Wolf volcano began spewing fire, smoke and lava before dawn Monday.
more »

Money »

Analysis The potential bond crisis most people have never heard of: Don Pittis
Many ordinary Canadians think they understand the risks of real estate. Stock market crashes are also on the popular radar. But the one of most dangerous bubbles may be growing in bonds, an asset class that seldom makes it as far as casual conversation. Don Pittis looks at why we should care.
Real estate woes: The secret lives of house poor Canadians
With rising housing prices and the lure of low interest rates, more Canadians are living house poor. We profile one family willing to talk about living "hand to mouth" as they struggle to keep their home and pay the bills.
Marg McCuaig-Boyd: Meet Alberta's new energy minister video
She's not a household name, but Marg McCuaig-Boyd is now one of the most important cabinet ministers in Rachel Notley's new NDP government in Alberta.
more »

Consumer Life »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Sports »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
NHL playoffs: 3 stories from Blackhawks-Ducks Game 5 video
The Anaheim Ducks escaped Monday night with a stunning 5-4 overtime victory as well as a 3-2 series lead over the Chicago Blackhawks in the Western Conference final.
Recap Rockets finally lift off, Warriors' Curry crashes in Houston win video
James Harden scored a playoff career-high 45 points and the Houston Rockets led from start to finish to avoid elimination in the Western Conference finals with a 128-115 victory over the Golden State Warriors in Game 4 on Monday night.
Video Steph Curry returns to Warriors-Rockets game after fall
Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry left Game 4 of the Western Conference Finals on Monday after a hard fall in the second quarter, but was able to return midway through the third quarter.
more »

Diversions »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
more »