Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

Day 3

Saturday is the world premiere of Otto; or, Up with Dead People, and I’m surprisingly calm. I’ve already shown the film to my husband, Antonio, who, trust me, is my harshest critic, and to Katharina Klewinghaus, the female lead of the picture, and they both really like it, so that’s good enough for me. The rest is just gravy and stale popcorn.

In the afternoon Jeremy, my Otto, and I catch a movie called The Broken, a British horror movie about monstrous doppelgangers who break out of mirrors to murder and replace people. Think Invasion of the Body Snatchers meets Alice Through the Looking Glass. Despite its overabundance of horror clichés, it isn’t half bad. Then again, that must mean it isn’t half good.

After picking up my director’s jacket and having lunch, Jeremy and I try to find a liquor store, trudging through slushy parking lots and a maze of snow banks. When I finally choose my booze for the Otto after-party and try to check out, the mean man at the cash register looks at us askance and asks Jeremy for I.D. I tell him he isn’t 21, and the guy freaks out and tells us to get out of the store immediately because it’s illegal for minors to even be on the premises. He informs me that we’re on the surveillance cameras and that I shouldn’t try to come back alone to buy booze today. That’s Utah for you. For alcoholics, it’s like the seventh circle of hell.

After a brief rest and a cocktail at the chalet, we change and get ready for our pre-screening dinner at a restaurant called The Windy Ridge. I’ve been invited to participate in a gathering which includes Isaac Julien (here with his new documentary on Derek Jarman), Tom Kalin (with his feature Savage Grace, starring Julianne Moore), Greg Araki (here to celebrate the 15th-anniversary reissue of his movie The Living End) and, apparently as kind of an afterthought, me. Marcus Hu of my usual U.S. distribution company, Strand Releasing, coordinated the event, and since all the filmmakers have Strand in common, and as we were all lumped together under the moniker New Queer Cinema in the early nineties, it only makes sense that the four of us, still crazy and going strong after all these years, should celebrate together.

When we get to the restaurant, however, it seems my entourage has been set up with a long table in an adjacent room next to the kitchen. Oh well. As a former farm boy, I’m always more comfortable with the help anyway. I do mingle in the main dining room with the other three filmmakers, each of whom I’ve known for many years, and we pose for photos together. When I bring Greg Araki over to our dining table in the sticks to say hello to everybody, he remarks, “Wow, this looks like the kids’ table!” It’s actually quite a smart way of looking at it: the kiddy table is always the most fun. Jeremy, who is a big fan of Greg’s great movie Mysterious Skin, is thrilled to meet him. Tom Kalin also comes over and hangs out. He’s very gracious and sweet. We reminisce about the time we both gave a talk on queer cinema at the Pompidou Center in Paris. I can’t wait to see his hot new mother/son incest movie. It’s his first film in fifteen years, and it already made quite a splash at Cannes.

Two more of my co-producers – my L.A. gallerist Javier Peres and my fellow Canadian artist and international art world It Boy Terence Koh – finally make their grand entrance. Terence is wrapped in an obscenely expensive black and white chinchilla and fox coat. Heady with excitement, we fast forward through our meal and head for the Library for our world premiere.

In the green room I’m still not nervous and I handle an interview with the French TV station Arte with aplomb, if I do say so. The next thing we know we’re whisked onto the stage to present the movie. I calmly introduce everyone, including my director of photography, James Carman, who has just arrived from Brazil with some sort of awful virus he got on the plane. He can hardly stand up.

It’s pretty much a typical Sundance screening for me. About a half an hour into the film, there is a scene in which one zombie f---s another zombie in the rotten hole in his stomach. On cue, entire rows of people stand up in unison and walk out. People always walk out of my screenings here, but sometimes it’s difficult to distinguish between those suffering from brutally long days of film-watching (ours is a midnight screening) - festival burn-out, as it were - and those who are genuinely offended by the film or dislike it for other reasons. But for the majority who stay until the bitter end, there is a very enthusiastic response, judging by the lively Q and A. My best review so far, however, comes from a group of six straight teenage girls and boys who are waiting outside the theatre when I leave. Shari Frilot, the programmer who introduced the film, tells me she doesn’t even know how they managed to get into the screening, which is restricted. As I pass they all yelled “Great movie!” and “That was awesome” and “Thanks for making that movie!” You can’t ask for a better review than that.

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

This discussion is now Open. Submit your Comment.

« Previous Post | Main | Next Post »

Post a Comment

Disclaimer:

Note: By submitting your comments you acknowledge that CBC has the right to reproduce, broadcast and publicize those comments or any part thereof in any manner whatsoever. Please note that due to the volume of e-mails we receive, not all comments will be published, and those that are published will not be edited. But all will be carefully read, considered and appreciated.

Note: Due to volume there will be a delay before your comment is processed. Your comment will go through even if you leave this page immediately afterwards.

Privacy Policy | Submissions Policy

Story Tools: PRINT | Text Size: S M L XL | REPORT TYPO | SEND YOUR FEEDBACK

World »

Historic Myanmar peace conference aims to end decades of violence
Myanmar begins a historic peace conference on Wednesday, with the aim of ending decades of violence between the Myanmar Army and ethnic armed groups that has claimed thousands of lives.
Justin Trudeau suggests China improve its image by tightening ties with Canada video
Justin Trudeau delivered a message to powerful business leaders in Beijing on Tuesday, shortly after his plane touched down: China needs a little more Canada.
Sperm donor at heart of Canadian lawsuits admits he lied to company Xytex, police say
An American who fathered more than 30 children through sperm donations, including at least seven in Canada, has admitted he lied to a sperm bank about his background, police said.
more »

Canada »

Crossbow slayings victims were mother, 2 brothers of accused killer video
The victims of last week's so-called crossbow killings in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough were the mother and two brothers of the man now charged with three counts of first-degree murder.
How a Woodbridge woman got a fraudster to admit his CRA threat was a scam
How do you scam a scammer? Just ask Dawn Belmonte.
Vancouver home affordability has biggest drop in 26 years: RBC
Housing affordability in Vancouver had its biggest drop in 26 years during the first half of the year, but signs of cooling are beginning to show up there, and in Toronto, according to a new report from Royal Bank.
more »

Politics »

Updated 30 punished for sexual misconduct, 97 cases under investigation, National Defence says video
The Canadian Armed Forces says it is making progress in the fight against sexual misconduct in the ranks, but much more work needs to be done.
Justin Trudeau suggests China improve its image by tightening ties with Canada video
Justin Trudeau delivered a message to powerful business leaders in Beijing on Tuesday, shortly after his plane touched down: China needs a little more Canada.
Ontario guaranteed-income pilot moves ahead with new report
Former Conservative senator Hugh Segal delivers a key report this week on a plan by Ontario to launch a pilot project to guarantee a minimum income for participants in a community still to be selected. In an interview, Segal gives some hints about the report's contents — and rebuts critics who say such programs foster laziness.
more »

Health »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Arts & Entertainment»

Chris Brown's home visited by L.A. police after call from woman
Authorities responded to singer Chris Brown's Los Angeles home early Tuesday after a woman called police seeking assistance, officials said.
Every Tragically Hip album finds a place on latest Canadian Billboard chart
Canada's insatiable appetite for the Tragically Hip has sent the rock band's entire discography back onto the national Billboard charts.
New PlayStation 4 Slim images appear weeks before Sony press event
Several images and videos of a slimmer Sony PlayStation 4 console have surfaced online, weeks ahead of its expected announcement.
more »

Technology & Science »

Dogs really do understand human language, study suggests
Scientists have found evidence to support what many dog owners have long believed: man's best friend really does understand some of what we're saying.
New PlayStation 4 Slim images appear weeks before Sony press event
Several images and videos of a slimmer Sony PlayStation 4 console have surfaced online, weeks ahead of its expected announcement.
New Squishy 'Octobot' may point to future of robotics
When you think of a robot, you might imagine a metallic humanoid — and indeed, most robots today have hard, rigid bodies made of metal and plastic. But CBC Radio technology columnist Dan Misener explains why the softer, more flexible robot nicknamed the 'Octobot' may be a sign of robots to come.
more »

Money »

4 reasons you should care about canola's role in Canada-China relations video
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's first official visit to China coincides with a Sept. 1 deadline that the Asian economic giant has set for Canadian producers to tighten their screening of our exports of canola to the country.
Potash Corp., Agrium in merger talks
Saskatoon-based Potash Corp. of Saskatchewan and Agrium Inc. of Calgary have confirmed they are in merger talks, a combination could produce a fertilizer giant worth more than $30 billion.
Vancouver home affordability has biggest drop in 26 years: RBC
Housing affordability in Vancouver had its biggest drop in 26 years during the first half of the year, but signs of cooling are beginning to show up there, and in Toronto, according to a new report from Royal Bank.
more »

Consumer Life »

Sorry - we can't find that page
 
CBC.ca

Sorry, we can't find the page you requested.

  1. Please check the URL in the address bar, or ...
  2. Use the navigation links at left to explore our site, or ...
  3. Enter a term in the Quick Search box at top, or ...
  4. Visit our site map page

In a few moments, you will be taken to our site map page, which will help you find what you looking for.

more »

Sports »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Analysis Blue Jays face crucial final month of season
Once again, the Toronto Blue Jays face an all-important September schedule as they try to secure a spot in the post-season. Here's a look at their opponents and how they stack up.
Rio 2016 Paralympics: CBC Sports to provide extensive coverage
The Rio 2016 Paralympic Games are just over a week away and CBC/Radio-Canada is ready to bring Canadians up close to all of the thrills and emotion of the athletic competition with more than 1,000 hours of available coverage.
Analysis CFL Power Rankings: Stamps still the team to beat video
With a disciplined win over Hamilton that pushed their record to 7-1-1, the Calgary Stampeders remain on top of our CFL power rankings.
more »

Diversions »

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
more »