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Expodition: Expo 67’s Indians of Canada

The Story


From the outside, it has all the benign symbols of the traditional North American Indian: a teepee, a totem pole, pounding drums and chanting. But inside, the Indians of Canada pavilion at Expo 67 tells a different story: one of poverty, unfulfilled treaties, forced religion and the unhappy experiences of children in residential schools. As a young hostess conducts a tour, a reporter from Expodition remarks on a tone of bitterness in the pavilion's exhibits. 

Medium: Radio
Program: Expodition
Broadcast Date: Aug. 4, 1967
Guest(s): Vera Robinson
Host: Bob MacGregor
Reporter: Jim Robertson
Duration: 10:56
Photo: Library and Archives Canada

Did You know?


• "We went to all the bands across Canada and asked them what they wanted to bring forward at the pavilion," remembered Andrew Tanahokate Delisle, commissioner general of the Indians of Canada pavilion, 40 years after Expo 67. "And the thing that kept coming up was their anger at the government."


• Visitors encountered large, stark statements such as "Give us the right to manage our own affairs" and "The white man's school, an alien land for an Indian child" throughout the pavilion.

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