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Auschwitz: Hana's suitcase turns out to be a replica

Six decades after Auschwitz was liberated, the biggest and most brutal Nazi death camp remains a potent symbol of terror and genocide. More than a million Jews were murdered there, as well as tens of thousands of Poles, Gypsies and Soviet prisoners of war. When Allied soldiers liberated the complex in Poland in January 1945, they found skeletal prisoners, mounds of corpses, gas chambers and cooling crematoria. Survivors scattered, many to Canada, to rebuild their lives. But the Nazi atrocities they witnessed have echoed through the years along with the cry "Never again."

media clip
The Auschwitz Museum admits the original suitcase was destroyed in a fire.
Medium: Television
Program: The National
Broadcast Date: April 6, 2004
Guest(s): George Brady, Fumiko Ishioka
Reporter: Joe Schlesinger
Duration: 5:01

Last updated: March 26, 2013

Page consulted on September 10, 2014

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