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D-Day: 'The last just war'

They sailed in under cover of darkness to smash down the walls of "Fortress Europe." On June 6, 1944, the Allied forces invaded the Normandy coast of Nazi-occupied France. The Canadians' entry point was a stretch of sand code-named Juno Beach. Many would die there but, for the Canadian forces, D-Day was a triumph that is still honoured at home and on the beach they called Juno.

Jack Granatstein and Brian Stewart discuss the historical significance of D-Day.
Medium: Television
Program: Prime Time News
Broadcast Date: June 6, 1994
Guest(s): Jack Granatstein
Host: Peter Mansbridge
Reporter: Brian Stewart
Duration: 9:34

Last updated: June 5, 2013

Page consulted on September 16, 2013

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