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Norad: Bomarc bases built in Quebec

One of the most terrifying visions of the Cold War was the spectre of Soviet bombers and nuclear missiles crossing the Arctic toward North America. To protect the continent, Canada and the United States created Norad, the North American Aerospace Defense Command: a vast array of electronic eyes forever sweeping over the continent. But the world changed since the 1950s, and Norad shifted focus to monitor drug trafficking and terrorism. Yet critics call the organization an expensive monument to the Cold War, and a first step on the slippery slope to weapons in space.

media clip
La Macaza, Que., will soon host Bomarc B interceptor missiles.
Medium: Television
Production Date: April 17, 1961
Reporter: Bill Cunningham
Duration: 2:05
This clip has poor audio.

Last updated: August 22, 2013

Page consulted on September 10, 2014

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