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Africville is destroyed

When dump trucks roared in to ship Africville residents out, it seemed like a good idea to city planners. By the 1960s, years of neglect and racism had made Halifax's oldest and largest black neighbourhood one of the worst slums in the country. But the relocation of Africville also meant the end of a vibrant community. As one former resident put it, they lost more than a roof over their heads, they lost their happiness.

(poor audio) Guided by a series of ambitious post-war renewal projects in the early 1960s, the City of Halifax expropriates Africville between 1964 and 1969.
Horrified residents look on as bulldozers level their community one building at a time.
• In 1970, Africville's last resident, 72-year-old Aaron (Pa) Carvery, threw in the towel and left Africville. "The day I left my home, a part of me inside died ... If I had been a little younger, city would never have gotten my land." (CBC's Canada: A People's History)
Medium: Television
Program: Gazette
Broadcast Date: Sept. 15, 1967
Duration: 2:00

Last updated: January 11, 2012

Page consulted on December 6, 2013

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