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Native protests get favourable response

It's a battle over the land and its resources. The fight has taken place on the land, in the courts and in the media. When government and native groups signed treaty agreements over a century ago, neither side imagined the repercussions. Canada's native people say treaties have been ignored and their rights — from logging trees to fishing eels — have been limited. In the 1980s, frustration grew and failed negotiations turned into roadblocks and deadly confrontation.

media clip
In 1989, blockades and confrontations result in agreement signing.


Medium: Television
Program: Sunday Report
Broadcast Date: July 9, 1989
Guests: Roland Crowe, Bernard Ominayak, Roy Whitney, Roderick Wilson
Host: Peter Mansbridge
Reporter: Paul Hunter
Duration: 2:22

Last updated: June 20, 2014

Page consulted on September 10, 2014

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