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Mammal mating computer service prevents extinction

Described as "gigantic brains," computers were once so big they filled entire rooms. It all started with ENIAC, the world's first computer, that cracked and buzzed and weighed 27 tonnes. By the 1960s, ordinary Canadians were fascinated with these new high tech devices: IBMs could set up blind dates, select Christmas presents and mysteriously dispense money. A novel idea until computer technology replaced real people on the job. These days computers continue to revolutionize — this time changing the way people communicate by way of the Internet.

System matches up love-lorn lions.

Medium: Radio
Program: As It Happens
Broadcast Date: Aug. 26, 1975
Guest(s): Ulysses S. Seal
Host: Alan Maitland
Interviewer: Elizabeh Gray
Duration: 4:58

Last updated: December 7, 2012

Page consulted on December 5, 2013

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