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Berger on native land claims, now settled

It was going to be the biggest private construction project in history. But before a pipeline could be built from the Beaufort Sea to energy-hungry markets in the south, the impact on the North's people, economy and environment had to be determined. That task was given to Justice Thomas Berger, who embarked on an extraordinary three-year odyssey across the Arctic. His report shocked the government that appointed him, and was heralded by some as "Canada's Native Charter of Rights."

For Commentary, Thomas Berger reflects on how new native rights settlements impact resource development.

Medium: Radio
Program: Commentary
Broadcast Date: Sept. 6, 1998
Guest(s): Tom Berger
Duration: 3:01

Last updated: December 7, 2012

Page consulted on December 6, 2013

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