CBC Digital Archives

The riots in St. Leonard

On March 31, 2005, the Supreme Court of Canada upheld Quebec's language law but ruled that the province must allow greater access to English schools. Back in 1977, when the Parti Québécois first introduced Bill 101, critics compared it to "lunatics taking over the asylum." Under Bill 101, even the "apostrophe s" in Eaton's, became illegal. The charter's defenders said such measures were necessary to protect the dwindling French culture and language from English dominance. CBC Archives looks back at the most debated law in Quebec.

A wrap-up of the St. Leonard riots over Bill 63, which sets out requirements for French-language instruction to anglophone and allophone children.
Medium: Radio
Program: Identities
Broadcast Date: Feb. 5, 1972
Host: Andrew Szende
Duration: 4:37

Last updated: February 20, 2013

Page consulted on December 6, 2013

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