CBC Digital Archives

Politics: International Politics

Looking for a specific CBC program for radio or television? Look no further. We've organized them below in alphabetical order for you to search through.

Number
of Clips
Project Name
Brief Description
11
At the Summit: Canada Welcomes the G8
It began in 1975 as an exclusive intellectual retreat where leaders of the world's industrial powers could discuss common interests face to face. What is now the annual G8 economic summit has been criticized as an expensive, media-oriented display that yields few tangible accomplishments. As Canada plays host for the fifth time in 2010, CBC Digital Archives looks back at the preparations, the players and the protests when the world's wealthiest power brokers came calling in 1981, 1988, 1995 and 2002.
16
Canada and the Fight Against Apartheid Part 1
For almost 50 years, South Africa was ruled by apartheid — a brutal system of racial separation that kept the nation's black majority in poverty while a white minority held the wealth and power. As unrest grew, South Africa seemed destined for a bloodbath. Canada — like many nations — was slow to react but, by the 1980s, assumed a leading role in forcing economic sanctions against South Africa. Canadian business people, activists and clergy also played parts in bringing about all-race elections in 1994, and a surprisingly peaceful end to apartheid.
16
Canada and the Fight Against Apartheid Part 2
For almost 50 years, South Africa was ruled by apartheid — a brutal system of racial separation that kept the nation's black majority in poverty while a white minority held the wealth and power. As unrest grew, South Africa seemed destined for a bloodbath. Canada — like many nations — was slow to react but, by the 1980s, assumed a leading role in forcing economic sanctions against South Africa. Canadian business people, activists and clergy also played parts in bringing about all-race elections in 1994, and a surprisingly peaceful end to apartheid.
10
India: Colonial Past, Global Future
India is the world's largest democracy and its second most populous, but for decades its image was mainly that of a poor nation with a rich history. Shaken by periodic religious strife and still largely a rural and agricultural country, India has nevertheless emerged in the new millennium as an increasingly important global player. From its colonial origins to the bright lights of Bollywood, CBC Digital Archives presents a collection of clips about India past and present.
32
International Politics General
24
Mr. President Goes to Ottawa
He is the most important leader in the world. And even though the country may not always like what they hear, when the president of the United States comes to Ottawa, Canada listens. From Franklin Roosevelt to Bill Clinton, U.S. presidents have been given the honour of addressing Canada's Parliament. Sometimes their speeches draw warm ovations; others are met by catcalls and anger. But over time, each presidential message has been an important indicator of the goodwill — and the problems — facing these neighbours.
6
Nelson Mandela: Prisoner, President, Peacemaker
Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela's life began in a tiny village in South Africa, which he describes as "removed from the world of great events." It was the start of a life that would not only take part in great events, but help shape them. His extraordinary life has led him from being branded a terrorist in his own country and a 27-year imprisonment to taking office as South Africa's first democratically elected president and becoming an international symbol of peace and social justice. The CBC Digital Archives brings you a look back at the remarkable life of Nelson Mandela.
5
Protest Silenced in Tiananmen Square
It was a protest unlike anything Communist China had ever seen. Night after night, for six weeks in the spring of 1989, thousands upon thousands of students and residents poured into Beijing's Tiananmen Square to demonstrate for democracy. It all came to a violent end in the early morning of June 4, when troops moved in with a show of force to break up the protest for good. CBC Digital Archives presents a selection of clips about the protest, the massacre and the aftermath.
21
Revolution and Evolution in Modern China
"When the sleeping dragon awakes," Napoleon once said of China, "he will shake the world." In the 20th century, multiple upheavals shook the Asian giant. The rule of emperors gave way to civil war and the Communist revolution, closing China to the world. The doors slowly opened in the 1970s with new diplomatic ties and economic reforms. The crackdown on democracy demonstrators in Tiananmen Square in 1989 barely checked China's growth, and today the world's most populous nation is on its way to superpower status. CBC Archives presents China as CBC journalists have seen it over the decades.
7
Revolution in Iran
In 1979 a cataclysmic revolution shook Iran, creating the world's first Islamic republic and altering the balance of power in the Middle East. With the widely despised Shah of Iran forced into exile, spiritual leader Ayatollah Khomeini returned to oversee the country's transformation. But peace was still elusive as student protesters overwhelmed the United States embassy in Tehran, taking hostages and launching a diplomatic crisis. CBC Digital Archives presents a series of clips about revolutionary Iran.
13
Swearing In: U.S. Presidential Inaugurations
It takes 35 words to become president of the United States. The presidential inauguration ceremony marks the beginning of a new term in the Oval Office. CBC Digital Archives has selected reports from Washington, D.C. that capture the swearing in of a new president from Franklin D. Roosevelt to Barack Obama.
15
The Rise and Fall of the Berlin Wall
In the ideological struggle that was the Cold War, East Germans voted the only way they could: with their feet. By the thousands each month, they escaped communist rule by slipping into the West through Berlin. In 1961, the East German government built a wall to keep them in. The Berlin Wall became both a barrier and a symbol of the differences between West and East, between democracy and communism. On Nov. 9, 1989, after floods of East Germans had left via third countries, the Berlin Wall came down, paving the way to German reunification.