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Bishop Desmond Tutu in Toronto

For almost 50 years, South Africa was ruled by apartheid — a brutal system of racial separation that kept the nation's black majority in poverty while a white minority held the wealth and power. As unrest grew, South Africa seemed destined for a bloodbath. Canada — like many nations — was slow to react but, by the 1980s, assumed a leading role in forcing economic sanctions against South Africa. Canadian business people, activists and clergy also played parts in bringing about all-race elections in 1994, and a surprisingly peaceful end to apartheid.

 Black leader pleads for help at Ontario Legislature.

Medium: Television
Program: The National
Broadcast Date: May 30, 1986
Guest(s): Bishop Desmond Tutu
Host: Knowlton Nash
Reporter: Alison Smith
Duration: 1:53

Last updated: July 9, 2013

Page consulted on January 27, 2014

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