CBC Digital Archives

Post-war homemakers: Creamed eggs and ham

What do women want? In 1945, CBC broadcasters were asking that question — at least in terms of radio and television programming. As the Second World War ended and Canada's postwar boom began, happy homemakers heard Kate Aitken's cold remedy or tips on how to make a pizza pie. But as the cheery '50s got on, women listeners requested more intelligent programming. They began to learn about setting up a theatre company and hear frank discussion about what going through a divorce was really like.

The secret to Eustella Langdon's creamed eggs and ham casserole is her Two To One Sauce: 2 tablespoons flour, 2 tablespoons fat, 1 cup of milk. Langdon, the host of CBC's Cooking School of the Air, prepares Two To One Sauce in this 1946 radio clip. Add the milk very slowly or the sauce will get lumpy. Then, pop your casserole under the broiler to brown and serve.

Langdon is an expert in the kitchen: At the top of the show, she conducts culinary research in a book called 300 Better Ways To Cook An Egg. Her assistant, "Mr. Tilden," doesn't seem quite as at home in her kitchen. Playing the role of sous-chef, Lamont Tilden searches the refrigerator for eggs. Once he finds them, he chimes: "Something's written on them: 'Hard.' Oh, I get it, they're hard-cooked eggs."

Tune in next week for Langdon on how to avoid cream puff pitfalls. 
Cooking School of the Air was broadcast across Canada on Mondays at 4:18 p.m. (EDT).
• The 1948 CBC Radio guide said the show was aimed at Canadian homemakers. It explained that host and Montreal cooking expert Eustella Langdon would present ideas for "tastier and more tempting meals."
• Listeners could write in to Landgon for her recipe of the week.

• Besides Creamed Eggs and Ham Casserole and Cream Puffs, Langdon's recipes included: Green Tomato Marmalade, Lima Bean Chowder, Dilled Vegetables and Apple Charlottes (custard cake made with bread or lady fingers).
• Like Cooking School of the Air, many programs for women after the Second World War had a homemaking tone.

• According to the essay, "Henrietta the Homemaker, and Rosie the Riveter: Images of Women in Advertising in Maclean's magazine, 1939-50," the way women were being portrayed in the media was beginning to change. In 1950, advertisements in Maclean's depicting women as homemakers rose to 70 per cent from 40 per cent in 1943.
• An ad for Weston's Bakery called mothers the "heart of her home."

• Authors of Canadian Women: A History found the francophone media to be even more traditional with images of women as "fervent Catholic, devoted wife and mother, and still attached to the rural way of life."
Medium: Radio
Program: Cooking School of the Air
Broadcast Date: Jan. 28, 1946
Guests:
Host: Lamont Tilden, Eustella Langdon
Duration: 11:30
This clip has poor audio.

Last updated: August 8, 2013

Page consulted on December 6, 2013

All Clips from this Topic

Related Content

Woodstock Remembered

They say if you can remember Woodstock, you weren't really there. Of course, that's not entire...

Barbara Frum: Pioneering Broadcaster Part 2

The sudden death of Barbara Frum on March 26, 1992 shocked Canadians. The loss of one of the c...

Barbara Frum: Pioneering Broadcaster Part 1

The sudden death of Barbara Frum on March 26, 1992 shocked Canadians. The loss of one of the c...

A Woman's Place: Programming for the Modern H...

What do women want? In 1945, CBC broadcasters were asking that question -- at least in terms o...

1985: Electric eels light up Christmas tree

The electric eels at the Vancouver Aquarium light up a tree for the holiday season.

Fair Game: Pioneering Canadian Women in Sport...

Throughout history, "ladies" were discouraged from participating in team sports because it was...