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Thalidomide compensation precludes welfare payments

It was supposed to be a harmless sedative for expectant mothers, but instead thalidomide caused thousands of babies around the world, including more than a hundred in Canada, to be born with severe birth defects. The Canadian government failed to warn the public of its dangers, and promised to compensate the thalidomide victims; it took almost 30 years for the government to deliver on that promise.

media clip
Compensation precludes welfare payments.

Medium: Radio
Program: As It Happens
Broadcast Date: Nov. 18, 1997
Guest(s): Colleen Martel, Tom McGregor
Host: Barbara Budd
Interviewer: Mary Lou Finlay
Duration: 9:49

Last updated: April 22, 2013

Page consulted on September 10, 2014

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