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Canada's biggest open pit asbestos mine closes

The needle-like fibres seemed like nature's perfect gift. Fireproof, indestructible and cheap, from the 1940s to the 1970s, asbestos was everywhere. It was woven into clothes, used to insulate buildings and even mixed with water as children's play dough. That was before studies linked asbestos dust with cancer and lung disease. Authorities now say asbestos, when handled properly, poses little risk. But nagging concerns, highlighted by the plight of the asbestos miners, have resulted in a shrivelling industry.

media clip
Residents of Asbestos, Que. protest the closing of the mines.

Medium: Television
Program: Canada Now
Broadcast Date: Nov. 27, 2002
Guest(s): Louise Moisan-Coulumbe, Yvon Vaillieres
Reporter: Lynda Calvert
Duration: 2:07

Last updated: April 22, 2013

Page consulted on September 10, 2014

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