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Canada's trees: Carver turns blight into beauty

It begins as a tiny stowaway on a crate from Europe or Asia, a relocated piece of firewood, or just a mild winter. Within decades, millions of hectares of Canada's woodlands have been laid waste because of it. Armies of tiny insects have stripped city boulevards of stately elms and ruined billions of dollars worth of softwood. Since the 1950s, science has fought these invading waves of caterpillars and beetles using everything from DDT to pheromones and bacteria. But victory seems no closer in the fight to save Canada's trees.

media clip
A Halifax artist makes carvings out of leftover stumps in Point Pleasant Park.
Medium: Television
Program: Canada Now
Broadcast Date: Aug. 9, 2001
Guests: Alex MacLeod, Andrew Williams, Joanne Young
Host: Laurie Graham
Reporter: Tom Murphy
Duration: 1:45

Last updated: October 4, 2013

Page consulted on September 10, 2014

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