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Life after Hurricane Hazel

On Oct. 15, 1954, the most famous hurricane in Canadian history struck Southern Ontario. Hurricane Hazel pounded the city of Toronto with 110 km/hr winds and more than 200 millimetres of rain in less than 24 hours. Bridges and streets were washed out, homes and trailers were washed into Lake Ontario. Thousands were left homeless, and 81 were killed – 35 of them on one street alone.

Toronto has learned the lessons of Hurricane Hazel well. Twenty-five years later, the courses of seven rivers have been changed, huge dams and reservoirs control water levels and a multi-million dollar master plan governs the flow of every river and stream.
. The Humber River rose six metres, sweeping away 14 homes on Raymore Drive and killing 32 residents in one hour.
. After Hurricane Hazel the Metropolitan Toronto and Region Conservation Authority was established to control water levels and purchase land in flood hazard areas. Raymore Park was then dedicated in memory of Hurricane Hazel's many victims and survivors.
. The TRCA now owns 32,000 acres and serves approximately one third of Ontario's population.
Medium: Television
Program: The National
Broadcast Date: Oct. 14, 1979
Guest(s):
Host: Knowlton Nash
Reporter: Michael Vaughan
Duration: 1:54

Last updated: January 11, 2012

Page consulted on December 6, 2013

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