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Saguenay flood damage not 'act of God'

For two days in July 1996, torrential rains pounded the Saguenay-Lac-Saint-Jean region of Quebec and caused the worst flood in the province's history. The floodwaters were so powerful they swept away a whole shopping complex, ripped apart homes and buried cars under mud. Scientists said it was a natural disaster likely to happen once every 10,000 years. The government called it "an act of God."

media clip
Inquiry head Roger Nicolet says dams and dykes failed.

Medium: Television
Program: The National
Broadcast Date: Jan. 16, 1997
Reporter: Tom Kennedy
Duration: 2:00

Last updated: May 3, 2013

Page consulted on September 10, 2014

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