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Vancouver: Gateway to the St. Lawrence Seaway

In 1535, Jacques Cartier stood on Mount Royal looking down in despair at the Lachine Rapids that barred his further progress inland along the St. Lawrence River. It wasn't until 1954 that a formal agreement between Canada and the U.S. finally made the St. Lawrence Seaway possible. Heralded as a marvel of engineering when it opened in 1959, the Seaway has been hit by environmental problems and hard economic times over the last two decades. What lies ahead for the Seaway?

 A satirical essay on Vancouver becoming the gateway to the St. Lawrence Seaway.

Medium: Radio
Program: Assignment
Broadcast Date: Nov. 15, 1956
Host: Maria Barrett, Bill McNeil
Reporter: Eric Nicol
Duration: 3:30

Last updated: October 1, 2013

Page consulted on December 6, 2013

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