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Major traffic jam on the Seaway

In 1535, Jacques Cartier stood on Mount Royal looking down in despair at the Lachine Rapids that barred his further progress inland along the St. Lawrence River. It wasn't until 1954 that a formal agreement between Canada and the U.S. finally made the St. Lawrence Seaway possible. Heralded as a marvel of engineering when it opened in 1959, the Seaway has been hit by environmental problems and hard economic times over the last two decades. What lies ahead for the Seaway?

 A report on a major traffic jam a year after the Seaway opens.

Medium: Television
Program: CBC Television News
Broadcast Date: May 6, 1959
Guest(s): Paul Ellis, James Secord
Reporter: Ron Laplante
Duration: 3:06

Last updated: October 1, 2013

Page consulted on December 6, 2013

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