CBC Digital Archives

Arts & Entertainment: Media

Looking for a specific CBC program for radio or television? Look no further. We've organized them below in alphabetical order for you to search through.

Number
of Clips
Project Name
Brief Description
15
Barbara Frum: Pioneering Broadcaster Part 1
Broadcaster Barbara Frum pioneered a tough interview style on CBC Radio's As it Happens and later on CBC Television's The Journal. Whether she was talking to Nelson Mandela, Harold Ballard or the grower of the world's biggest cabbage, Frum's unrelenting curiosity, her fearless search for the truth, and her empathy and humour made her one of Canada's most important broadcasters.
14
Barbara Frum: Pioneering Broadcaster Part 2
The sudden death of Barbara Frum on March 26, 1992 shocked Canadians. The loss of one of the country's most respected broadcasters at the age of 54 reverberated across living rooms of the nation. The courage and tenacity she showed in her very private 18 year battle with leukemia was reflected in her tough, pioneering interview style on CBC Radio's As it Happens and later on CBC Television's The Journal. Whether she was talking to Nelson Mandela, Harold Ballard or the grower of the world's biggest cabbage, Frum's unrelenting curiosity, her fearless search for the truth, and her empathy and humour made her one of Canada's most important broadcasters.
19
Bringing the World Home: International Correspondents
An international correspondent's life can be exhilarating — the travel, the adventure, the sense of being right in the middle of where it's all happening. But it can also be very risky, especially in a war zone. And it can take an emotional toll on even the most seasoned journalist. The job comes with ethical and philosophical considerations, not to mention practical questions — like what do you pack? From the Second World War to present day, CBC Archives examines what it's like to be a CBC journalist abroad.
21
Canada Tunes In: The Early Years of Radio and TV
On a summer's day in 1927, Canadians coast to coast sat enthralled before their radio sets as Prime Minister Mackenzie King spoke to them from Parliament Hill. Through the 1930s radio kept them entertained, and in wartime radio kept them informed. Then, Canadians were captivated all over again by television. In 1952 a bald puppet named Uncle Chichimus ushered them into the TV age, and in 1966 an animated butterfly made Canadian TV a more colourful pace.
10
Child’s Play: Popular CBC Children’s Show Hosts
They come into our living rooms via the radio or TV set, speaking directly to the kids with a friendly, familiar tone. It's a rather intimate set-up, which is why the hosts of popular children's programs often hold a special place in our hearts — even long after we've grown up. From Mary Grannan to Ernie Coombs, the CBC Digital Archives has compiled a collection of radio and TV interviews featuring some of the CBC's most cherished children's program hosts.
16
Concentration to Convergence: Media Ownership in Canada
In the world of mega mergers and convergence, there's growing concern about a monopoly of ideas. Reporters argue increased ownership will shake the very foundation democracy is founded upon. Owners say it's the only way Canadian newspapers can survive in the new global economy. Press ownership has been officially debated, studied and scrutinized in Canada since the 1969 Royal Commission on Newspapers. Is freedom of the press guaranteed only to those who own one? It's a debate that continues to percolate.
16
David Suzuki: Scientist, Activist, Broadcaster
For over three decades, David Suzuki has been Canada's foremost environmental conscience. From his experiments with fruit flies to his warnings about genetically modified food, Suzuki has made science relevant, interesting and full of wonder to his audiences. As a broadcaster for the CBC, he has issued frank warnings against industry, the economy and his fellow scientists. Passionate and outspoken, he has also won his fair share of critics. But despite, or perhaps because of this, Suzuki remains undeterred in his message.
17
June Callwood: Canada's Conscience
No one was excluded in the world of June Callwood. The celebrated journalist/activist with a "just fix it" attitude worked tirelessly for countless causes. She helped found over 50 social organizations including Nellie's women's shelter and Casey House, Canada's first AIDS hospice. Dubbed St. June, the woman with movie star good looks and an unwavering capacity for compassion, battled personal tragedy, depression and controversy in a long life that served as Canada's conscience.
20
Marshall McLuhan, the Man and his Message
He was a man of idioms and idiosyncrasies, deeply intelligent and a soothsayer. He had prescient knowledge of the Internet. Although educated in literature, Marshall McLuhan was known as a pop philosopher because his theories applied to mini-skirts and the twist. For his ability to keep up with the cutting edge, one colleague called him "The Runner." Critics said he destroyed literary values. Today, McLuhan's ideas are new again, applied to the electronic media that he predicted.
32
Media General
21
Peter Gzowski: Voice of Canada
For three hours a day, five days a week – for 15 years – millions tuned in to CBC Radio's Morningside and Peter Gzowski. Despite Gzowski's dishevelled appearance, this beloved radio host cast his folksy charm across the country. When Gzowski died in 2002, Canadians paid tribute to the broadcaster whose stammering informality and comforting voice had become a symbol for Canada.
21
Radio Canada International: Canada's Voice to the World
In February 1945, the "Voice of Canada" spoke to the world for the first time. The CBC International Service was founded to broadcast to Canadian Forces overseas in the Second World War. At war's end the radio service focused on telling the world about Canada in over a dozen languages. Despite budget cuts and critics who accused it of employing communists or operating as a government mouthpiece, the service now called Radio Canada International has persevered. CBC Archives looks back on RCI's six decades on shortwave.
20
Ruling the Airwaves: The CRTC and Canadian Content
"Canadian broadcasting should be Canadian." Pierre Juneau said those words in 1970 and he meant business. The Canadian Radio-Television Commission head said Canadian broadcasters were behaving like mouthpieces for American "entertainment factories," and introduced strict Canadian content rules for radio and television. Artists, actors, executives and politicians squared off. Would "CanCon" rules create a world-class recording industry and a "Canadian sound"? Or would they promote unwatchable shows, unlistenable music and mediocre Canadian talent?
6
Ruling the Airwaves: extra clips
"Canadian broadcasting should be Canadian." Pierre Juneau said those words in 1970 and he meant business. The Canadian Radio-Television Commission head said Canadian broadcasters were behaving like mouthpieces for American "entertainment factories," and introduced strict Canadian content rules for radio and television. Artists, actors, executives and politicians squared off. Would "CanCon" rules create a world-class recording industry and a "Canadian sound"? Or would they promote unwatchable shows, unlistenable music and mediocre Canadian talent?
7
The Arcade Age
In October 1958, physicist William Higinbotham developed Tennis for Two, a basic, monochromatic game played on an oscilloscope. It took almost 20 years before computer games could be produced for consumers. Pac-Man, Space Invaders, Donkey Kong and others captured imaginations, gobbled up quarters and offered an exciting and accessible new pastime. The CBC Digital Archives looks back on the early days of video games in North America and the birth of a cultural phenomenon.
6
Waking Up With Andy Barrie
Since 1995, CBC Radio's Andy Barrie has been waking up Torontonians with his warm, friendly voice and thoughtful interviews. As Barrie retires as host of CBC Radio's Toronto morning show, Metro Morning, CBC Digital Archives celebrates his career. We've got excerpts from his first day on the job at Metro Morning and the day he announced his retirement, as well as select interviews. Just for fun, we even have a 1982 CBC-TV clip in which Barrie performs card tricks.