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Marconi's miracle, 100 years later

On a summer's day in 1927, Canadians coast to coast sat enthralled before their radio sets as Prime Minister Mackenzie King spoke to them from Parliament Hill. Through the 1930s radio kept them entertained, and in wartime radio kept them informed. Then, Canadians were captivated all over again by television. In 1952 a bald puppet named Uncle Chichimus ushered them into the TV age, and in 1966 an animated butterfly made Canadian TV a more colourful pace.

media clip
Elettra Marconi, daughter of the inventor, visits Newfoundland for Marconi centennial celebrations.
Medium: Television
Program: Saturday Report
Broadcast Date: Feb. 24, 2001
Guest(s): Elettra Marconi, Paul O'Neill
Host: Suhana Meharchand
Reporter: Carolyn Dunn
Duration: 2:41

Last updated: January 3, 2013

Page consulted on November 4, 2014

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