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July 2011 Archives

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Area codes, land claims and remembering the Penticton riots

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In a couple of years, you could be dialing a 236 area code to make a phone call. We'll find out why.

Making final offers. A move by Ottawa to settle specific land claims has angered many First Nations leaders. We'll hear from a lawyer who specializes in Aboriginal law.

The Peach Festival Riots. Twenty years ago today, thousands of people swarmed through Penticton attacking police cars,and staining the town's reputation. We'll talk to former mayor Jake Kimberley about that night.



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A wine bloggers conference, Hibaq Farah and Stephen Lewis on the famine in Somalia

It is a journey that many people have made, but few have wanted to actually do. As thousands of people flee Somalia on foot, we'll hear one woman's account of a similar journey she made almost twenty years ago.

Penticton has been announced as host city of the North American Wine Bloggers Conference for 2013. We'll hear from an organizer.

Former MP Stephen Lewis looks at the role politics are playing during this latest famine in East Africa.

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A supernova sonata

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The sky above us is often a source of beauty. But one B.C. scientist is also using it as an inspiration for music. Alex Harrison Parker is a graduate student from the University of Victoria who has created something called the Supernova Sonata.

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Bookclub:

Man Booker nominee Esi Edugyan

Making the list. The long list for the Man Booker Prize was released today and a Victoria writer made the cut for a book that isn't even out in Canada yet. We'll meet Esi Edugyan.

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Bookclub:

Teen Books - Little books big stories

Nikki Tate talks about Shot at Dawn by John Wilson,  Reckless by Lesley Choyce, and Branded by Eric Walters.

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Nakusp man plays father goose

Playing mother goose. We'll hear from Nakusp man Kelvin Neil who's raising two orphaned Canada Geese, and trying to reintroduce them to the wild.

Burning questions. The province has said yes to Metro Vancover's plans to incinerate millions of tons of garbage. We'll look at what this could mean for the rest of the province with  journalist Frances Bula.

Jumping on the bandwagon. Kids at B.C. Children's Hospital now have a chance to hop into a literal bandwagon. A new mobile studio was unveiled today as part of a music therapy program.. we'll hear all about it.

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The Bandwagon Legacy Project

Jumping on the bandwagon. Kids at B.C. Children's Hospital now have a chance to hop onto a literal bandwagon. A new mobile studio was unveiled in July as part of a music therapy program. We talk to co-founder Garth Richardson.

The Bandwagon Legacy Project

 
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Coming to grips with a tragedy

Coming to grips with a tragedy. We check in with Son of Norway Jim Hall.

B.C. MP Nathan Cullen on Jack Layton's cancer announcement.

Keeping goats on the roof. We'll hear about a thirty five year old tourist attraction in the Vancouver Island community of Coombs.

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Canadian crime rate is declining, Archie comes out and carbon tax analysis

Anthony Doob says the drop in crime in Canada has nothing to do with enforcement or sentences, because that doesn't encourage people to stop committing crimes. He says the reduction in crime is part of a steady long-term trend, linked to things like demographics, social policies and reforms to youth justice

The Archie comics are growing up and coming out. They've seen multiple spinoffs and plot twists in recent years, and now a new comic book in the Archie series features a character who's gay. Our pop culture critic Lisha Hassanali dishes about Archie's changing world.

Mark Jaccard thinks BC should abandon the idea of becoming "carbon neutral" (by buying carbon offsets) and instead extend the carbon tax to all of BC's greenhouse gas emitters (right now only 75% of greenhouse gas emitters are being taxed).

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Chopping for cherries, Elizabeth May and wine apps

Drying out. It has been so wet that some cherry growers in the Okanagan are using helicopters to blow water from their trees.

Slashing environmental reviews. The federal agency that reviews major industrial projects could be facing funding cuts. We find out from Green Party Leader Elizabeth May what this means.

Helping create the perfect dinner. If you're not sure which wine to pair with which food. Why not ask the wine guru? We'll tell you about a new iPhone app created in B.C.

 
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Island Artisans:

Island Artisans

Soya Nova Smoked Tofu
Don Genova visits a tofu company on Salt Spring Island that has been quietly making tofu for more than a quarter-century.

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Following the leaders

We hear about Newfoundland's giant ice island from engineer Jim Bruce.

Premiers from Canada's provinces and territories are in Vancouver today for the Council of the Federation Conference. We head to the scene with a Calgary reporter.

After four surgeries, Rumana Monzur has been told she will never see again. We'll talk to a friend and colleague of the UBC scholar about how she is coping.

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Bookclub:

Summer Mystery Book Series

Unravelling the mystery. We find out about the hottest trends in crime writing from book shop owner Frances Thorsen.

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Writing as a team. We talk to one half of a successful mystery writing duo George Szanto  about working with a partner.

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Finding a detective on the bus. There's a new sleuth on the B.C. mystery scene and she's a transit cop. We'll talk to author Debra Purdy Kong about the first  novel in her Casey Holland series.
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Heading for the Chilcotin. Our final B.C. mystery writer this week is Roy Innes. We'll talk about his latest book where RCMP members Coswell and Blakemore find themselves dealing with cattle ranchers and aboriginal politics.

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Bookclub:

"Dreams of Joy" by Lisa See

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Dreaming of Joy. Bestselling author, Lisa See, drops by the studio to talk about her new novel that takes us to a dark time in China's history, Chairman Mao's Great leap Forward. 

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Newfoundland's giant ice island

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Liberating the data

Liberating the data. The B.C. government is putting a pile of information online, including freedom of information requests, for anyone to see and use. We'll hear what it all means from open data activist David Eaves

Drying up and leaving millions starving. The East African country of Somalia is facing one of the worse droughts in decades. We hear what this means from a professor at Royal Roads University.

Calling a hot weather convert. We'll check in with a CBC host who has moved from Vancouver to Regina and see if he is bummed about missing our cool wet summer.

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Taking obese children away from their parents

Should obese children be taken away from their parents? That's the subject of a recent study from the American Medical Association. We'll hear what one professor of health sciences thinks about all this.

Covering the crisis. Reporter Curt Petrovich spent last week among hundreds of southern of Solain refugees in overcrowded camps in Kenya. We hear from him.

Dreaming of Joy Bestselling author, Lisa See, drops by the studio to talk about her new novel that takes us to a dark time in China's history, Chairman Mao's Great leap Forward.

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Rural seniors get support, firefighters win, and Port Refrew survives on tourism

It may be a relatively simple act, like helping someone get to an appointment, or cleaning up a bit around their house. Since last fall, the University of Northern BC has been part of a study looking into how we can best help older citizens in smaller and rural communities.

Fighting more than fires. Firefighters in BC won their battle to get cancer of the esophagus covered by WorkSafe benefits. We talk to the daughter of one firefighter who died of the disease.

Once it was all fish and forestry. Port Renfrew has been trying to find a new economic base. Now the Chamber of Commerce is forging what once would have been an unlikely partnership. It has teamed up with an environmental group to sell the old growth trees that surround the town ... without cutting them down. We speak to Rosie Betsworth, President of the Port Renfrew Chamber of Commerce.

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Coming of age with Harry Potter

Turning off the tap. The B.C. Supreme Court has ordered an island town to stop pumping water from wells after finding the province didn't consult properly with First Nations. We'll hear from aboriginal lawyer and politician Judith Sayers.

Coming of age with Harry Potter. Kelly Nakatsuka catches up with the line-up to see the last installment of the popular teen wizard franchise.

Growing up in the band. We meet two brothers who have spent their lives touring with their dad, bluegrass legend Del McCoury.

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Stories that matter vs attracting eyeballs

Saying goodbye to opera singer Pierette Alarie-Simoneau.

Selling the story. A  promising young television reporter quit his job and posts a long essay laying out everything he thinks is wrong with the business. We'll talk to a TV veteran who now teaches journalism.

Relatively singing. Nathan Rogers reflects on the legacy of his Dad, Stan Rogers.

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Saying goodbye to a Canadian opera legend

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Staying together by living apart

Increasing ICBC rates, staying together by living apart, a new report on B.C. Coroner Services and an ambitious new plan for child care. 
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A record-breaking paddle

We speak to B.C. adventurer Colin Angus about breaking the record for paddling around Vancouver Island.

Getting results. Tough drinking and driving laws reveal a a dramatic success.  We'll speak to both the head of the B.C. restaurant association and police chief Jamie Graham.

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C-Difficile outbreak in Ontario, sand sculptor wins, and taxing First Nations.

The C. difficile outbreak in Ontario has claimed the lives of 18 people...and has health professionals on alert.

Denis Kleine just got back from Germany after he and his friend helped another 22 sculptors break the Guiness World Record for longest sand castle ever!

Taxing the patience of native peoples. A prominent First Nations organization has come out squarely against the HST. Find out why.

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Todd Butler at Music Fest, how charity donations are spent, and commercial fishing agreement reached

Musician, Todd Butler talks about performing at the Vancouver Island Music Festival in Courtenay.

Greg Thomson says Canadians shouldn't assume their dollars always go towards research when they donate to the Canadian Cancer Society.

Two Port Alberni bands finally cash-in on the sockeye salmon they've fished for centuries. Fisheries and Oceans Canada have reached a commercial agreement with them.

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Homeless advocate tours Canada, downed power lines create chaos, and safe sleep strategies for babies

Homeless advocate Mark Horvath talks about his cross-Canada trip, his twitter and youtube following, and how he used to sleep on the streets.

A B.C. Hydro transmission tower anchored in the Fraser River toppled over. The collapse dropped high-voltage power lines onto Highway One in Coquitlam - and caused another tower inland to come down.

B.C.'s Coroners Service says there have been more cases of sudden infant death syndrome so far this year than all of 2010. We discuss some sleep-strategies for your children that won't increase their risk.  

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Understanding our southern neighbours

Understanding our neighbours to the south. As Americans celebrate Independence Day we'll take a look at how different our two countries and cultures really are.

Making sense out of a possible deadly bear attack. A community near Lillooet is still in shock after discovering a woman's remains were eaten by four black bears. We speak with a bear biologist about the aftermath.

Musician Nathan Rogers talks about his guitars.

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Fred Penner, MS trials and Dominion Day in Barkerville

Children's entertainer Fred Penner drops by for a pre-Canada Day chat with Jo-Ann.

Treating Multiple Sclerosis - Canada is funding clinical trials of a controversial treatment for the disease, and we'll speak with a doctor who has gone through liberation therapy.

Celebrating Canada Day in front of the cameras. We head to the historic town of Barkerville to see what it has in store for Canada's 144th Birthday!

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