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Chris Hadfield's guide to life on earth

hadfield.JPGWhat it's like to walk in space is just one of the things covered in Chris Hadfield's new book,  An Astronaut's Guide to Life on Earth. Throughout, he's able to put you in the boots (and spacesuit) of those who've gazed upon the wonder of space, as well as in the station itself -- "There's an Alice in Wonderland moment where you pause to decide which way will be up", he writes, "it's subjective and no longer dependent on the law of gravity".

 

Among other things Alan learned as he read through the book: "Spitting is a very bad idea without the force of gravity to help stuff go down the drain and stay there"...the reason why part of the International Space Station is painted salmon...and how Chris Hadfield's nail clippings ended up being launched into the face of the commander for Expedition 34.

 

In the midst of quite-brilliantly described space stories, the former commander of the Space Station explains how all those experiences apply to life back on Earth. Including toilet fixing. About five times in the book he refers to the space toilet breaking down. Hadfield is of course back on earth now and in the midst of the book tour, and he joined us for a chat.

 

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