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Season 4: "Heroes & Villains"

Airs on Radio One:
Saturday 23 January, 2010 10am
Monday 25 January 2010 11:30am

Just as Lex Luthor makes Superman more heroic, and Moriarty makes Holmes more brilliant, heroes are defined by the villains they face. In marketing- a brand is often defined by the problem it solves- or the rival brand it's up against. This week Terry O'Reilly shows how strong villains, problems, obstacles and rivals play a vital role in building up a 'hero' brand. And he'll explain how comparison ads can turn rival 'hero' brands into villains.

Listen to this episode as streaming audio (runs 27:30)

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Previous Comments (9)

Do you have a podcast or a way that I can download & listen to your programs off line? I am unable to tune in at the times when it is on the air, and I really enjoy Age of Persuasion. How can I get it other than live on air?

Michael

Michael Whiting, January 24, 2010 1:44 PM

Excellent show as always! I was watching the Tonight Show with Conan O'Brien last week and he had Barry Manilow on as a guest where he indicated that he wrote the jingles for Bandaid (I am stuck on band aid brand 'cause bandaid's stuck on me) and State Farm (like a good neighbour state farm is there). I was wondering if you could do a show dedicated to the mighty jingle - obviously it can't be easy to write a short clip that instantly connects with the listener. I was wondering if there were other famous musicians that had written jingles.

I look forward to the rest of the season!

Singher, January 25, 2010 12:34 PM

Singher-

Actually, we did that very show- "Music in Advertising" way, way back (if 1995 counts) in our original series "O'Reilly on Advertising."
We even had a section of the show on Barry Manilow covering those very points, and featuring concert audio of him singing his 'best of' jingles.
And you're so right- the craft is not easy.
Thanks for Listening

Mike Tennant
Producer, AOP

Mike Tennant, January 25, 2010 2:37 PM

I would like to add to the context of 'the leaky bag' anecdote. One bag leaked and the other did not. In my opinion that is important.Legal and journalistic 'objectivity' held that it is the rate of leaking that is important. Perhaps advertising gets at a 'greater truth'.

Gareth Evans, January 25, 2010 3:18 PM

Thanks Mike!

Sadly that was long before I started listening to CBC. Is there any way I can purchase the episode? The O'Reilly on Advertising CD set on the website doesn't contain that episode.

singher, January 25, 2010 3:36 PM

Yet another great episode. I think AOP is one of the few shows on any form of media that I really feel I've missed, and must download/stream at a later date if I'm not around during original airing. Excellent production, very slick. Now, are there plans on Pirate creating a Televised version of the show at some point, or are the licensing issues tenfold when we step into Television's realm and start talking about what's going on behind the curtain?

John Burton, January 25, 2010 5:28 PM

Terry and Mike - please, please, please make Age of Persuasion and O'Reilly on Advertising available as podcasts. I'll pay and I'm sure others will too.

If not I'd be very interested to hear how podcasts fail to meet the criteria of your master plan. I'm sure the explanation will be interesting.

Also - have you spoken about social media yet? I'll check the back catalogue but if it's not there I'm looking forward to hearing your take.

Your show is my favourite programming on CBC radio - or any radio for that matter.

Keep up the good work.
Cam

Cam McRae, January 28, 2010 7:46 PM

Why is there not a xml to download the podcast like other CBC shows? Help to listen off line.

Thanks

Rudy Bredda, January 30, 2010 11:13 PM

Just an impassioned echo of the preceding comments. I've enjoyed your work going right back to "O'Reilly on Advertising, but find it nearly impossible to be near a radio during broadcast times. It's very frustrating to trip over Terry on the rare occasion I'm in the car at that moment, only to have to turn it off mid-program when I arrive at my meeting. (I suspect you'd be a lousy excuse for tardiness, though I could be wrong about that.)Please find a way to make these programs available to those of us not driving somewhere at airtime. We'll pay for podcasts, audible.com downloads, CDs, whatever. HELP!

Michael Lennick, February 8, 2010 11:54 AM
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