Canada is ...

Namwayut: we are all one. Truth and reconciliation in Canada

Chief Robert Joseph shares his experience as a residential school survivor and the importance of truth and reconciliation in Canada.

'I heard the words, "I'm sorry", and then I couldn't see because my eyes were just, flowing with tears.'

Chief Robert Joseph shares his experience as a residential school survivor and the importance of truth and reconciliation in Canada. 4:20

Chief Robert Joseph was six years old when his mother dropped him off at St. Michael's residential school in Alert Bay, B.C.

He spent 11 years there.

Despite the government's attempt at assimilation he is one of the last few speakers of the Kwakwaka'wakw language.

He has received many awards and honours and chaired and consulted with numerous organizations locally and internationally. Today he is the ambassador for Reconciliation Canada.

In this segment of Canada is ... Chief Joseph shares his experience as a residential school survivor and the importance of truth and reconciliation in Canada.

Canada is ... is an online series produced in collaboration with Thought Café showcasing the many facets of Canadian identity. Leading figures in each field explore how their area relates to Canadian culture and capture a part of what it means to be Canadian.

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